Collaborative seeks data for new industrial efficiency initiative

ACEEEdataRequest
Large industrial energy consumers have a chance to join a collaborative effort to create a new type of energy-efficiency program that would ultimately provide them with incentives to purchase more efficient industrial equipment. The Extended Motor Product Label Initiative (EMPLI) would also give utility efficiency program managers prescribed savings values for the energy performance of industrial motor-driven products.

The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) is working with the Hydraulic Institute (HI), Air Movement and Control Association International, Compressed Air and Gas Institute, Fluid Sealing Association, National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and a dozen utilities and energy-efficiency programs to launch this initiative. Central to the program are voluntary performance labels that show the comparative efficiency of an “extended product” comprised of a driven component (e.g., fan, pump, or compressor), a motor and associated controls.

Donate data to science
EMPLI has reached the point where the working groups need product category-specific application and operational data to determine the average potential savings. The collaborative is starting with collecting water pumping system operating hours and loads. This information will be used in program proposals to state public service commissions to document that labeled products save energy.

HI and NEMA Business Information Services (NEMA Biz) have contracted with the collaborative to collect, anonymize and aggregate the data. Organizations interested in participating can download a data collection sheet on the HI website, fill it out and submit it electronically to NEMA Biz for analysis. The submission deadline is Sept. 30, 2015. All individual company data will remain secure and will not be shared with anyone.

The EMPLI pump working group is requesting general data, such as hours of operation, percentage loading, product performance and markets served. NEMA Biz will anonymize and aggregate the data and return it to the working group in a format that state public utility commissions will be able to use for program justification and evaluation. Participating organizations will also receive a copy of the aggregated data.

This information will provide insights into the marketplace and enable participants to position their products for new utility-sector funding opportunities. The better the data, the more complete the report will be for all involved.

Building better programs
Collecting operational data is necessary for the success of the EMPL Initiative. The goal of the collaborative effort is to develop product performance labels that companies and public institutions can use as purchasing specifications. The labels will also provide the basis for an entirely new type of prescriptive rebate energy-efficiency program that attributes or “deems” an average energy savings to a qualifying product.

EMPLI has the potential to help industrial consumers and their power providers to move beyond individual equipment upgrades to increase the efficiency of entire systems. ACEEE is urging utilities to share this request with their commercial and industrial customers, and to participate in the survey themselves if it is appropriate for the utility.

Source: The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, 7/17/15

Data, coordination needed to unlock energy savings in water conservation

The water-energy nexus has received more attention lately, especially from Western customers grappling with long-term drought in their service territory. We understand the connection between the two resources: Producing electricity requires water, and moving, treating and re-treating water requires energy. Undoubtedly, there are opportunities to create cross-cutting conservation strategies, but so far, utilities and policymakers have paid little attention.

Watts in a Drop of Water: Savings at the Water-Energy Nexus,Redirecting to a non-government site a new paper from the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE), seeks to quantify the water-energy nexus across a range of energy intensities for water and wastewater services. It also examines the potential avoided energy consumption from water efficiency programs and provides estimates of the possible energy savings.

One barrier to creating a program template or sharing best practices is that the range of water’s energy intensity varies widely from system to system. This is largely due to differences in size of the water systems, pumping requirements between geographic locations and raw water characteristics. Drawing from existing data, the paper develops national estimates of energy savings associated with conserving water throughout the processes of conveyance, heating and water and sewage treatment. The data show a dramatic range of energy intensity, particularly in the water service sector (source, conveyance and treatment).

Another problem the paper identifies is that there is a lack of raw data on energy use by water and wastewater facilities across the country. Traditionally, energy and water utilities have siloed priorities, focusing only on delivering their respective products.

However, with increased interest in using energy efficiency to meet greenhouse gas and other pollutant standards, utilities and air regulators should be looking for every opportunity to achieve greater savings. The authors found that some local and state jurisdictions are seeking better documentation of water-energy interactions to facilitate more integrated program development and evaluation.

ACEEE concludes that there is a big opportunity for savings, but much more work needed to achieve them. Utilities and regulators need more data along, with solid methods to calculate energy savings from water conservation. If energy and water utilities are willing to collaborate on innovative projects, the benefits, particularly in states facing severe droughts,Redirecting to a non-government site would be huge.