ACEEE releases third, final video in ‘Health and Environment’ series

Energy Retrofits Clear the Air in Pittsburgh, You are leaving WAPA.gov. the final installment in a three-part video series from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), is now available to watch online.

The videos share the stories of homeowners in three eastern states, and the effect energy-efficiency upgrades have had on their lives. The theme running through the series is that reducing energy waste lessens the need to burn fossil fuels to generate electricity. Those cuts deliver big gains in health, because pollutants from burning fossil fuels contribute to four of the leading causes of death in the United States: cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, heart disease and stroke.

The series is part of ACEEE’s new Health and Environment program, launched last year to research the linkages among health, environment and energy efficiency, and to educate policymakers. Later this year, ACEEE will release a series of reports that will further explore the health and environmental benefits of saving energy.

A two-day Conference on Health, Environment & Energy ACEEE is planning for December will showcase the research and promote others’ work in this growing field. Utilities are welcomed to attend the conference in New Orleans to add their voices to this critical conversation.

Source: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, 2/6/18

ACEEE video series links energy efficiency, public health

Oh, energy efficiency! Is there anything you can’t do? As if saving consumers money and managing our loads isn’t enough, a video series by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy You are leaving WAPA.gov. (ACEEE) makes the argument that more efficient buildings play a role in keeping us healthy.

An efficient home is a comfortable home
An efficient home is a comfortable home. (Photo by DOE Weatherization Program)

Utilities across the nation are greening their portfolios by adding more renewables and distributed generators as the technologies become more affordable. However, just as the kilowatt-hour you don’t use is the cheapest, it is also the cleanest. The ACEEE series highlights a benefit of energy efficiency that often gets little attention, especially on the personal scale.

Each video presents a case study on how weatherization has helped to improve the health of homeowners and their families. The series launched in December 2017 with a video about a senior citizen living in a trailer in rural West Virginia. After a local anti-poverty program weatherized her home, the woman’s chronic breathing problems eased and her utility bills decreased.

Part two, released this month, shows how better insulation and air sealing have improved a child’s asthma condition in Baltimore. The series will conclude in February with a look at how weatherization is mitigating the effects of outdoor pollution in Pittsburgh. All videos will be available on ACEEE’s website.

In March, ACEEE will release The Next Nexus: Exemplary Programs That Save Energy and Improve Health, a report detailing programs nationwide that work to improve public health by improving building health. These programs represent potential partners for utilities and municipalities seeking to promote weatherization and other building efficiency initiatives. The report also highlights the non-energy benefits of weatherization—such as improved comfort and indoor air quality—helping utility program managers build a stronger case for efficiency upgrades.

If the report whets your appetite to learn more about the intersection of energy efficiency and public health, ACEEE is hosting its first Conference on Health, Environment and Energy in New Orleans in December. The event will offer many opportunities to network and brainstorm with other professionals in these fields. It is time to share the news that reducing energy waste is not only good for your bottom line, it is good for your community.

Source: American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, 1/8/18