Learn about irrigation strategies for West Coast growers

West Coast Irrigation Efficiency
Sept. 28, 2015
1 p.m. MDTCA-irrigation

Agricultural growers are more concerned than ever about increasing both water and energy efficiency in addition to improving crop yield and quality. Knowing when, where and how much to water can improve a grower’s bottom line in good times, and save the business in an ongoing drought such as California is experiencing. Join Western Area Power Administration on Sept. 28 for a free webinar You are leaving Western's site. focusing on technology and best practices in precision irrigation for West Coast agricultural customers.

Changes in irrigation technology over the last two decades have helped farmers in the Golden State make impressive reductions in water use. For example, the Almond Board of California You are leaving Western's site. claims that using drip irrigation has reduced the amount of water it takes to grow a pound of almonds by 33 percent.

However, achieving this kind of success requires an understanding of smart controls and monitoring tools, as well as data on crops, soil, weather, topography and more. Irrigation districts, water utilities and municipalities are challenged to persuade agricultural customers that relearning everything they know about irrigation is worth the effort, and to connect growers with the experts who can help them.

West Coast Irrigation Efficiency features presentations on emerging technologies for precision irrigation. Speakers with expertise on both drip and pivot irritation systems will discuss how to turn a mountain of raw data into an actionable plan and design for an irrigation system.

Brian Bassett is founder of H2O OptimizerYou are leaving Western's site. a company that provides data- and technology-driven strategies to maximize returns in production agriculture. The company has been working with the Fresno Water, Energy and Technology Center You are leaving Western's site. to improve drip irrigation technology.

As the Agricultural Technical Lead for Bonneville Power Administration, Tom Osborn has developed programs and tools to help Northwestern growers improve water and energy efficiency. His areas of specialization include scientific irrigation scheduling and irrigation system testing and performance.

Presentations will offer examples of successful irrigation efficiency programs, along with contacts for participants who wish to learn more. A Q&A period will follow the speakers.

Western encourages growers, utilities, irrigation consultants, researchers and policy makers to attend West Coast Irrigation Efficiency. There is no cost to participate in the webinar, but registration is required.

Source: Washington State University Energy Extension, 9/14/15

More cities, dates added to California water code seminar schedule

The schedule for a seminar covering plumbing code changes in California has been expanded into the fall, and water utilities throughout the state will have more opportunities to attend.

Green Technology has added four new dates for Reducing Potable Water Use:   Understanding Opportunities in Recent Plumbing Code Changes.

To deal with the ongoing drought, California has passed mandatory restrictions on urban potable water use—a first in state history—and water utilities have their work cut out for them. This five-hour seminar from Green Technology offers an in-depth look at the code specifications and helps building, design and construction professionals successfully navigate the design, permitting and inspection process. Utilities, especially municipal water providers, will find ideas and opportunities for managing their water supply more efficiently and for helping their large key accounts.

The fee for the seminar is $265, with discounts for groups of four or more. Continuing education credits are available. Please contact Cindy Dangberg at 626-577-5700 if you have any questions.

Source: Green Technology, 8/6/15

Water conservation strategies topic of California seminar series

CalWaterSeminarsIn response to the historic mandatory restrictions on potable water use enacted by the California State Water Resources Control Board, Redirecting to a non-government site the nonprofit Green Technology initiative Redirecting to a non-government site is presenting seminars throughout the state for utility and construction industry professionals.

Reducing Potable Water Use: Understanding Opportunities in Recent Plumbing Code Changes will explore how changes to the California Plumbing code can help to reduce potable water use. The new codes open the door to establishing standards and guidelines for greywater systems, on-site water recycling and rainwater catchment systems.

Low-flow fixtures and other common water-saving measures cannot reduce water consumption enough to meet the required reductions. This five-hour seminar will introduce building owners and water utility employees to the non-potable water strategies that will take conservation programs to the next level.

Featured speaker Greg Mahoney has more than 25 years of experience in building code enforcement, and is currently the chief building official for the city of Davis, California. In addition to being a certified combination inspector and plans examiner, he is a certified building official, certified access specialist, Leadership Energy Efficient Design accredited professional, Building Performance Institute building analyst and certified Home Energy Rating System rater.

Get an in-depth look at the code specifications and learn how to successfully navigate the design, permitting and inspection process. Mahoney will also cover emergency water conservation regulations Redirecting to a non-government site found in CALGreen that were approved May 29 and went into effect June 1.

Facility managers and design and construction professionals who attend can earn five continuing education units, or CEUs, from the American Institute of Architects. Sessions will also offer renewal points for Build it Green Redirecting to a non-government site (one credit per hour) and Construction Management Association of America Redirecting to a non-government site (one per hour).

To make it easier for busy professionals to attend the seminar, Green Technology is presenting it at five different locations in California:

The $265 registration fee includes lunch, and discounts are available for groups of four or more. Please call 626-577-5700 if you have any questions.

Source: Green Technology, 6/17/15

Department of Interior invests $50 million in water conservation projects in drought-stricken West

Interior’s WaterSMART Program to Support 64 Projects in 12 States

As part of the Obama Administration’s continued effort to bring relief to western communities suffering from the historic drought, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced on May 20 that Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation will invest nearly $50 million to improve water efficiency and conservation in California and 11 other western states.

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell (at podium) held a press conference at the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant and Japanese Garden in Van Nuys, California, to announce federal funding for water and energy conservation projects. (Left to right) L.A. Sanitation Director Enrique C. Zaldivar, P.E., Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López and LADWP Chief Sustainability and Economic Development Officer Nancy Sutley joined Secretary Jewell for the announcement. (Photo by US Bureau of Reclamation)

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell (at podium) held a press conference at the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant and Japanese Garden in Van Nuys, California, to announce federal funding for water and energy conservation projects. (Left to right) L.A. Sanitation Director Enrique C. Zaldivar, P.E., Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López and LADWP Chief Sustainability and Economic Development Officer Nancy Sutley joined Secretary Jewell for the announcement. (Photo by US Bureau of Reclamation)

Joined by officials from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power You are leaving WAPA.gov. (LADWP) and the Bureau of Reclamation, Secretary Jewell made the funding announcement at the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant in Van Nuys, California. The plant, which purifies millions of gallons of wastewater each day, was a fitting setting to launch federal-state partnerships dedicated to a more sustainable and resilient water future.

Through the WaterSMART Program, Reclamation is providing funding for water conservation improvements and water reuse projects across the West. More than $24 million in grants is being invested in 50 water and energy-efficiency projects in 12 western states. Seven water reclamation and reuse projects in California will receive more than $23 million and nearly $2 million will fund seven water reclamation and reuse feasibility studies in California and Texas.

WaterSMART is the Department of the Interior’s sustainable water initiative. Since it was established in 2010, the initiative has provided about $250 million in competitively-awarded funding to non-federal partners, including tribes, water districts, municipalities and universities. These investments have conserved enough water to meet the needs of more than 3.8 million people. Every acre-foot of conserved water delivered means that an equivalent amount of existing supplies is available for other uses.

WaterSMART water and energy-efficiency grants can be used for projects that conserve and use water more efficiently, increase the use of renewable energy, improve energy efficiency, benefit endangered and threatened species, facilitate water markets, carry out activities to address climate-related impacts on water or prevent any water-related crisis or conflict. The 50 projects announced in Los Angeles will be leveraged with at least 50 percent non-federal funding for a total of $133 million in improvements over the next two to three years. For a complete description of the 50 projects, visit the WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency grant website.

Source: US Department of Interior via Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, 5/20/15

Los Angeles recognized as water conservation leader

A recent article in the New York Times Redirecting to a non-government site highlights the progress the city of Los Angeles has made in water conservation. The words “water” and “Los Angeles” still cause much of the public, including residents, to think of the California Water Wars that inspired the film “Chinatown.” But over the past 15 years, the city has quietly become something of a pioneer in cost-effective, environmentally beneficial water conservation, collection and reuse technologies.

The South Los Angeles Wetlands Park repurposed a former transit brownfield site as a sustainable green space that treats storm runoff. The City of Los Angeles Bureaus of Engineering and Sanitation, Recreation and Parks, the Metro Transit Authority and Council District 9 partnered with Psomas engineering firm to build the innovative stormwater capture system. (Photo by Psomas.)

The South Los Angeles Wetlands Park repurposed a former transit brownfield site as a sustainable green space that treats storm runoff. The City of Los Angeles Bureaus of Engineering and Sanitation, Recreation and Parks, the Metro Transit Authority and Council District 9 partnered with Psomas engineering firm to build the innovative stormwater capture system. (Photo by Psomas.)

Not just a pioneer, but an award winner as well: The U.S. Water Alliance Redirecting to a non-government site  bestowed one of its first water sustainability awards on the city’s water integrated resource plan in 2011. Another honor followed this year when the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure gave its Envision Platinum Award to the South Los Angeles Wetlands ParkRedirecting to a non-government site The project turned nine acres of disused bus maintenance yard into a public park that doubles as stormwater treatment facility.

Results mean more than awards and imitation, however, and Los Angeles is seeing those, too. The city now consumes less water than it did in 1970, while its population has grown by more than a third. Projects like the retrofit of the flood-prone Elmer Avenue in the Sun Valley neighborhood are showing that rainwater collection can be cost effective, too. Production of water like that captured by the project costs $300 an acre-foot, compared to the $800 to $1,000 per acre-foot Los Angeles now pays for imported water.

The success of the demonstration projects spurred city officials to adopt an ambitious 20-year water management plan that treats the Los Angeles Basin as a single watershed. The state supports the massive plan, but implementation will be difficult given that more than 100 water-conveying entities operate in the basin.

A city that imports 89 percent of its water cannot rest on its conservation laurels, especially as droughts in the West threaten to lengthen and deepen. Even so, Los Angeles is taking bold steps to address a problem—water shortage—that most municipalities in our region will face. Western congratulates Los Angeles and looks forward to sharing more success stories on the city’s water management plan.

Source: New York Times, 12/7/14