California building code requires rooftop solar for new homes

Starting in 2020, all new residential homes in California must be built solar ready. On May 7, the California Energy Commission approved the 2019 Building Energy CodeYou are leaving WAPA.gov. which includes that provision.

The California Energy Commission approved the 2019 Building Energy Code, which includes the provision that all new homes must be built solar ready, starting in 2020.

The California Energy Commission approved the 2019 Building Energy Code, which includes the provision that all new homes must be built solar ready, starting in 2020. (Photo by DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy)

This historic revision of building energy codes is expected to drive a large investment in residential rooftop solar and energy efficiency as California pursues its goal of getting 50 percent of its energy from renewables by 2030You are leaving WAPA.gov.

In addition to mandating rooftop solar, the code contains incentives for energy storage and requires new home construction to include advanced energy-efficiency measures. Using 2017 data, ClearView Energy Partners You are leaving WAPA.gov. estimate that the mandate could require between 68 and 241 megawatts of annual distributed solar buildout.

Good for consumers, solar, storage industries
The commission stated that the new code is meant to save Californians a net $1.7 billion on energy bills all told, while advancing the state’s efforts to build-out renewable energy.

Following the commission’s decision, solar developers such as Sunrun, Vivint Solar and First Solar experienced a surge in stock prices, Bloomberg reportedYou are leaving WAPA.gov.

The updated codes also allow builders to install smaller solar systems if they integrate storage in a new home, adding another incentive to include energy storage. California has been a leader in incentivizing energy storage. In January, the California Public Utility Commission moved to allow multiple revenue streams for energy storage, such as spinning reserve services and frequency regulation.

Utilities question policy
The solar industry received a prior boost in January 2016, when the CPUC approved its net metering 2.0 rate design. The state’s investor-owned utilities asserted at the time that net metering distributed generation from electricity consumers shifted the costs for the system’s maintenance and infrastructure onto consumers who do not own distributed generation.

ClearView analysts pointed to the distributed solar mandate as a possible opening for utilities to argue that California regulators should reconsider the net metering reform proposal. According to the report ClearView published ahead of the CEC’s decision, utilities that opposed the new rate-design could claim that mandating distributed solar alters the policy landscape enough to warrant further review of the compensation levels paid to excess generation.

Source: Utility Dive, 5/9/18

IREC provides online solar training for local code officials

A new rooftop photovoltaic solar array is being installed every minute in the United States, with 4 million expected to be generating power by 2020. Knowledgeable building code professionals are needed to make sure these systems are installed correctly and safely. To help ensure quality inspections, the Interstate Renewable Energy Council You are leaving WAPA.gov. has launched a new online interactive video solar training series You are leaving WAPA.gov. for local code officials.

Taking the approach of the popular DIY series, This Old House, developers have created videos that are as entertaining as they are informative. Online viewers join IREC Training Specialist Joe Sarubbi to follow seasoned building and electrical inspectors through the finer points of five different solar inspections. Each video highlights a different type of system and technology, including:

  • Microinverter systems
  • DC-DC converter systems
  • Tesla Powerwall energy storage systems
  • Ground mounted AC-coupled systems with energy storage
  • Commercial carport systems

Presented in an engaging, easy-to-watch video format, the training can be completed in just a handful of lunch-hour sessions and is aimed at new and experienced residential inspectors, as well as residential PV installers.

The videos incorporate the 2017 National Electrical Code and the most current international building, residential and fire codes. “The new PV Inspector Online Training course for code officials brings together a remarkable group of experienced PV system inspectors from across the country to present a wide variety of PV system types and technologies,” said Rebekah Hren, a member of the NEC’s Code Making Panel 4.

Check out this short video for a look at how the solar training for code officials looks and feels. The training is available online free of charge for a limited time.

IREC developed the training in conjunction with the International Association of Electrical Inspectors You are leaving WAPA.gov. and International Code Council You are leaving WAPA.gov. with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. Continuing Education Units are available from the IAEI, ICC and the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners. You are leaving WAPA.gov.

Source: Interstate Renewable Energy Council, 5/16/18

Free webinar looks at building code for manufactured housing

Sept. 10
12 p.m. Pacific Time

Many parts of the West are grappling with a housing shortage—particularly a shortage of affordable homes—so utilities can expect to see more manufactured houses in their service territory. Power providers can wait and see how these buildings affect their load or they can take action to encourage buyers to choose safer, more efficient homes. Learn about efforts to increase energy efficiency in manufactured housing Sept. 10 when the Emerging Technologies Showcase webinar series presents Manufactured Homes – New Efficiency for the Lowest Cost Housing Option.

Manufactured homes—those built in a factory and moved to a site—conform to federal code set by Housing and Urban Development (HUD) construction and safety standards rather than local building codes. Energy Star provides manufacturers with a higher voluntary standard they can meet to receive an Energy Star certification.

In anticipation of HUD updating its code to match the current voluntary efficiency standards, a partnership of utility and building industry professionals completed a study to develop the next generation of voluntary standards. Bonneville Power Administration, the Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction and Northwest Energy Works teamed up to collect and evaluate energy use data on eight high-performance manufactured homes.

This webinar will present the study’s findings and look at ways utilities could incorporate the higher standards into incentive programs for customers buying manufactured homes. Participants will also learn about different state and federal regulations governing manufactured housing. A question-and-answer session will follow the presentation.

Participation is free but registration is required. All webinars are recorded and available from Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies and Conduit, an energy-efficiency forum for the Northwest.

Bonneville Power Administration sponsors the Emerging Technologies Showcase series with support from Western Area Power Administration.

Source: Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies, 8/17/15