Celebrate energy efficiency, public power in October

Public Power Week
Oct. 2-8

Energy Efficiency Day
Oct. 5

It is fitting that as the days get noticeably colder and darker, we recognize the people who make sure we can light and warm our homes (and cook hearty meals and take hot baths) all year around. Public Power Week You are leaving WAPA.gov. is Oct. 2-8, and this year, Oct. 5, Energy Efficiency Day You are leaving WAPA.gov., is dedicated to the role wise energy use plays in keeping electricity reliable and affordable.

Public Power Week, Oct. 2-8, 2016 an American Tradition

(Artwork by American Public Power Association)

American Public Power Association (APPA) sponsors Public Power Week and provides plenty of resources to help utilities get their celebration off the ground. You can suggest your local municipality issue a proclamation, send messages on your social media platforms and provide local media with news releases and public service announcements. Post facts from APPA’s public power and energy-efficiency fact sheets on your website and make sure your member services representatives have copies handy to share.

Let your customers know Oct. 5 is Energy Efficiency Day.

Let your customers know Oct. 5 is Energy Efficiency Day. (Artwork by ResourceMedia)

Speaking of energy efficiency, do your customers know that this “power source” has prevented the need to build 313 large plants since 1990? According to American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy You are leaving WAPA.gov. (ACEEE), further ramping up energy efficiency could spare the country from having to build 487 large power plants over the next 14 years. The inaugural Energy Efficiency Day offers utilities the chance to educate consumers on the importance of saving energy.

Energy efficiency saves consumers and businesses money, creates jobs and stimulates the economy. It is also one of the lowest-cost ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The best part is that most utilities already have experience with energy-efficiency programs ranging from simple rebates for efficient appliances to sophisticated demand-response programs. Reminding your customers of the benefits of energy efficiency measures can help to encourage them to participate in existing programs and make them more receptive to future offerings.

The inaugural Energy Efficiency Day is a collaborative effort of regional and national organizations working to promote energy efficiency, including the ACEEE, Appliance Standards Awareness Project You are leaving WAPA.gov. and many others. APPA, colleges and universities, trade allies and investor- and publicly owned utilities are among the organizations supporting #EEDay2016.

If you would like to add National Energy Efficiency Day to your Public Power Week celebration, you can find a link to a toolkit You are leaving WAPA.gov. on the SWEEP blog, Livewire. Feel free to supplement the material with your own success stories, and don’t forget to share your plans with the Energy Services Bulletin, because every day is Energy Efficiency Day for WAPA Energy Services.

Source: American Public Power Association, Southwest Energy Efficiency Project, 9/9/16

New fact sheets from ACEEE focus on industrial energy use

Compared to programs targeted at other sectors, industrial efficiency programs offer significant energy-saving opportunities at a relatively low cost, yet many large energy users have barely tapped their industrial energy efficiency potential. To help communicate the value of commercial and industrial (C&I) energy efficiency, the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy You are leaving Western's site. has released four new fact sheets examining different aspects of industrial efficiency programs.

According to a white paper by the State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action), on a national level, the industrial sector saves more energy per program dollar than do other customer classes. Industrial programs can help states comply with the Clean Power Plan, while improving productivity and competitiveness for manufacturers and keeping energy costs low for all customers.

Educate stakeholders
First, however, your board and large account representatives must fully understand the benefits of C&I programs and be prepared to make the business case for them to your customers. Start by sharing these fact sheets with your staff:

  • Industrial Efficiency Programs Can Achieve Large Energy Savings at Low Cost cites statistics from programs across the country supporting the cost-effectiveness of implementing industrial efficiency measures. Because industrial customers often represent the majority of a utility’s energy demand, building strong relationships with a few of the largest energy users is an effective use of program resources. You will also find tips from SEE Action for designing effective offerings.
  • The Dollars and Cents of Industrial Efficiency Program Investment explains how combining industrial customer investments in energy efficiency combine with utility infrastructure investments to yield deep energy savings with medium-term paybacks. Industrial customers can often be persuaded to make investments with longer payback periods when utility programs address capital planning processes and financial hurdles. A list of the broader benefits of energy efficiency to the business, the utility and the community could help to sell the partnering strategy to your board.

Support participation
All 50 states have mandated a ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency program that counts efficiency as a resource and provides a mechanism for funding customer projects that reduce energy use. However, some of these laws allow businesses to opt out of funding and participating in the programs, or that allow customers to control some or all of their efficiency fees. These fact sheets clarify these exemptions and discuss the often- misunderstood implications of such policies:

  • Overview of Large-Customer Self-Direct Options for Energy Efficiency Programs outlines the status of self-direct programs and opt-out provisions by state, and includes tips for designing successful self-direct programs. If the biggest energy consumers do not participate in a program designed to spread the cost of efficiency across all customer sectors, all customers miss out on the the benefits of efficiency. Alternatively, the self-direct option gives C&I customers the flexibility to design programs that meet their business needs while ensuring measurable and verifiable energy savings. The fact sheet also identifies key elements in successful self-direct provisions.
  • Myths and Facts about Industrial Opt-Out Provisions busts commonly held misconceptions that lead policy makers to include opt-out provisions in energy-efficiency programs. This fact sheet may be particularly useful where lawmakers and big energy users are pushing to add opt-out provisions to an effective existing program.

Links to all four of these fact sheets can be found in Energy Services publications, along with other resources on technology and programs.

Energy department issues largest energy-efficiency standard ever

That boom you may have heard at the end of 2015 was the Department of Energy Appliance and Equipment Standards Program sending the year out with historic new efficiency standards for commercial air conditioners and furnaces. The new standards are expected to save 1.7 trillion kilowatt-hours over 30 years of sales, or almost as much energy as one year’s worth of coal generation in the United States.

Tons of savings
Rooftop air conditioners cool about half the commercial floor space in the nation. The DOE also set standards for commercial warm air furnaces, which are typically installed with the rooftop commercial air conditioners. Over the lifetime of the products, the standards will save businesses $167 billion on their utility bills and reduce carbon pollution by 885 million metric tons.

According to DOE estimates, the new rooftop air conditioner standards will save more energy and cut more emissions than any other standards completed by the agency. The previous record-setters were the 2014 standards that covered electric motors and the 2009 fluorescent tube lamp standards.

ASAPgraph

(Graph by Appliance Standards Awareness Project)

Takes teamwork
Representatives of individual manufacturers, installers, utilities, environmental groups and efficiency organizations actively contributed to the development of the standards. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy You are leaving Western's site., the Appliance Standards Awareness Project You are leaving Western's site. (ASAP) and the National Resource Defense Council You are leaving Western's site. were among the 17 stakeholder groups participating in the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC).

ASRAC uses negotiated rule-making to engage all interested parties, gather data and attempt to reach consensus on establishing energy-efficiency standards. The proof of the process is in the savings—about 5 billion metric tons of emissions in 2014—and in the support for its work. In an interview with UtilityDive You are leaving Western's site., Marianne DiMascio of ASAP observed that the work of the committee often goes unnoticed because it is largely uncontroversial—a rare thing for a government agency in today’s political climate. “It doesn’t always make for exciting news to say there’s a policy that many people agree with, that is having a huge impact, and it’s about the type of motor your air conditioner uses [or the amount of insulation on a water heater],” she said.

Phasing in
These new commercial air conditioning and furnace standards will occur in two phases. The first phase will begin in 2018 and will deliver a 13-percent efficiency improvement in products. Five years later, an additional 15-percent increase in efficiency is required for new commercial units.

Visit the DOE website to learn more about the energy-efficiency standards for commercial air conditioners  and warm air furnaces.

ACEEE: Economists, energy practitioners need to work together to improve energy efficiency programs

In a recent blog post You are leaving Western's site., Steven Nadel, executive director of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, suggested that energy-efficiency programs could benefit if economists and energy professionals combined their skills, instead of talking past each other.

In the past year, economists have been producing more and more papers questioning the effectiveness of energy-efficiency programs and policies. Acknowledging that not all programs are well-designed, Nadel pointed out that the studies, too, have flaws that prevent them from providing meaningful evaluation.

One problem, he observed, is that the two industries use different methods to measure results. Economists tend to prefer rigorous evaluation through randomized control trials. In these studies, a large group of potential participants is randomly assigned to either a study or control group. But randomized control trials can be very difficult to implement, as even some economists admit. In full-scale programs that are available to all utility customers, random assignment to a control group is simply not possible.

In recent years, the energy-efficiency community has increasingly relied on the use of “deemed savings estimates” that are supposed to be based on prior evaluations. Unfortunately, these evaluations are not always as rigorous or as frequent as they need to be to give an accurate estimate.

Some study designs evaluate only certain aspects of a program, while overlooking goals and benefits that were central to the implementers’ intent, the ACEEE executive director said. He also noted that there have been times economists applied conclusions drawn from one evaluation to programs that have little in common with the one studied.

Nadel proposes that the two sides need to work together; first, to identify typical and similar program models for study; and second, to develop evaluation methods for those programs that combine each community’s professional strengths. Economists tend to be good at research methods, he notes, but don’t always understand the markets they are evaluating. Energy-efficiency program managers need to convey to researchers the program goals, and potential benefits that go beyond simple cost-benefits analysis.

Evaluation of energy-efficiency programs to determine what works—for utilities and customers—is an ongoing challenge for program designers. Nadel concluded that if the economic and energy-efficiency communities could learn to collaborate rather than work in silos, the studies they produce could lead to more effective programs.

Source: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, 12/8/15

Collaborative seeks data for new industrial efficiency initiative

ACEEEdataRequest
Large industrial energy consumers have a chance to join a collaborative effort to create a new type of energy-efficiency program that would ultimately provide them with incentives to purchase more efficient industrial equipment. The Extended Motor Product Label Initiative (EMPLI) would also give utility efficiency program managers prescribed savings values for the energy performance of industrial motor-driven products.

The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) is working with the Hydraulic Institute (HI), Air Movement and Control Association International, Compressed Air and Gas Institute, Fluid Sealing Association, National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) and a dozen utilities and energy-efficiency programs to launch this initiative. Central to the program are voluntary performance labels that show the comparative efficiency of an “extended product” comprised of a driven component (e.g., fan, pump, or compressor), a motor and associated controls.

Donate data to science
EMPLI has reached the point where the working groups need product category-specific application and operational data to determine the average potential savings. The collaborative is starting with collecting water pumping system operating hours and loads. This information will be used in program proposals to state public service commissions to document that labeled products save energy.

HI and NEMA Business Information Services (NEMA Biz) have contracted with the collaborative to collect, anonymize and aggregate the data. Organizations interested in participating can download a data collection sheet on the HI website, fill it out and submit it electronically to NEMA Biz for analysis. The submission deadline is Sept. 30, 2015. All individual company data will remain secure and will not be shared with anyone.

The EMPLI pump working group is requesting general data, such as hours of operation, percentage loading, product performance and markets served. NEMA Biz will anonymize and aggregate the data and return it to the working group in a format that state public utility commissions will be able to use for program justification and evaluation. Participating organizations will also receive a copy of the aggregated data.

This information will provide insights into the marketplace and enable participants to position their products for new utility-sector funding opportunities. The better the data, the more complete the report will be for all involved.

Building better programs
Collecting operational data is necessary for the success of the EMPL Initiative. The goal of the collaborative effort is to develop product performance labels that companies and public institutions can use as purchasing specifications. The labels will also provide the basis for an entirely new type of prescriptive rebate energy-efficiency program that attributes or “deems” an average energy savings to a qualifying product.

EMPLI has the potential to help industrial consumers and their power providers to move beyond individual equipment upgrades to increase the efficiency of entire systems. ACEEE is urging utilities to share this request with their commercial and industrial customers, and to participate in the survey themselves if it is appropriate for the utility.

Source: The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, 7/17/15

Celebrate Earth Day with tips to reduce home energy use

Earth Day turns 45 tomorrow, a good time to reflect on what each of us can do to protect our health, economy and security. SmarterHouseYou are leaving WAPA.gov. a comprehensive, online guide to home energy savings from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient EconomyYou are leaving WAPA.gov. can empower consumers to reduce their carbon footprint, and support utility efforts to manage demand and meet environmental regulations.SmarterHouse

Here is a sampling of tips from SmarterHouse to help consumers save money and improve their comfort during the coming cooling season:

  • Upgrade your cooling system. If your central air conditioning is 10 to 15 years old, or you suspect it is just not performing up to par, you may want to service or replace the unit before it gets really hot. Consider calling in a qualified home performance contractor so you don’t end up selecting an inefficient model that will add to your expenses over the long term. The decision should depend on your climate, and whether you are replacing an existing unit or installing an entirely new system.
  • Use your air conditioning (AC) less and fans more.  You can take several steps to optimize the performance of your cooling system. Start by keeping the air filters clean so they don’t impede air flow and damage the unit, conditioning only when ventilation is inadequate and avoiding cooling unoccupied rooms. Also, using your AC in conjunction with ceiling or standing fans is a more efficient way to cool. Whenever you leave home, adjust your thermostat to a warmer temperature to save energy. Better yet, install a programmable thermostat to automatically adjust the temperature every day. You can save 3 to 5 percent on cooling costs for each degree that you raise the thermostat, and it works in the winter, too!
  • Drive green. You are leaving WAPA.gov. You don’t have to wait until you buy a more eco-friendly vehicle to reduce your environmental impact from driving. Little changes in the way you maintain and drive your car, like properly inflating your tires or carrying a lighter load when you travel, can make a big difference. Did you know that carrying around an extra 100 pounds reduces fuel economy by about 1 percent?
  • Change your lights. In the average American home, lighting is about 5 to 10 percent of total energy use, or $75 to $200 on the annual electricity bill. Reduce those numbers—and your cooling costs—by replacing traditional heat-generating incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescents (CFLs) or light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Gain even more savings by installing light sensors and lamp timers on fixtures.

Read more tips.

SmarterHouse is the evolution of ACEEE’s Consumer Guide to Home Energy Savings, and like that resource, it provides a roadmap for improving home performance and cutting energy waste. Utility program managers will find it useful for communicating the value of efficiency programs to customers and for increasing customer satisfaction with upgrade projects.

The environmental challenges the nation faces on Earth Day 2015 can seem daunting. The good news is that energy efficiency is a secret weapon that consumers can use to gain control of their energy use and comfort, and utilities can use to turn customers into partners in load control.

Source: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, 4/22/15

Study to explore connection between energy efficiency, community resilience

ACEEEresearchThe American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy You are leaving WAPA.gov. (ACEEE) is launching a new research project this year to explore how energy-efficient systems can help a community withstand extreme weather and economic stresses.

A recent ACEEE blog post suggested ways in which energy-saving measures might enhance a community’s resiliency. In a direct example, combined-heat-and-power (CHP) systems kept the power on at critical facilities during Superstorm Sandy in 2012. While 8.5 million customers lost power, some hospitals, residential buildings, universities and public services were able to continue operating and provide services to citizens. CHP generators tend to use natural gas and highly efficient turbines and engines to serve very local loads, but can also run on biomass or biogas in times of disaster.

Embracing energy efficiency may protect communities in less obvious ways. “Resource resiliency” refers to reducing a community’s demand for natural resources, thereby freeing income to spend on other needs that benefit the local economy. Individuals and communities could invest their energy cost savings in safer and more durable buildings, distributed generation systems or effective emergency management plans.

Energy efficiency offers other long-term benefits to the community, such as creating more economic activity and jobs. Should the unthinkable happen, a vital local economy will be in a better position than a depressed one to recover from a disaster. Reduced energy use also means fewer emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants, leading to improved public health.

The ACEEE study will explore opportunities in policy and program development to integrate efficiency and resilience efforts, and attempt to determine metrics for measuring efficiency-related resiliency. Researchers are encouraging members of the energy- efficiency and resilience communities to share their views on the efficiency-resilience interconnection. Suggestions about valuable literature, case studies, potential metrics and policy and program opportunities are also welcomed. ACEEE expects to release the research report this coming summer.

Source: American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, 2/4/15

Catching up on industry news

Welcome to 2015, a time to start fresh and explore new territory. Whether that means launching or updating efficiency programs, seeking out more education or bringing attention to your successes, here are some news items to help you on your way.

Efficiency increases in 2014
Watch for new appliance efficiency standards from the Department of Energy. In 2014, DOE issued a total of 10 new or updated standards, including commercial refrigeration, electric motors, external power supplies, furnace fans, metal halide lamps, wall-unit air conditioners and walk-in coolers. Altogether, these 10 standards will help reduce carbon dioxide emissions by more than 435 million metric tons and save American families and businesses $78 billion in electricity bills through 2030.

Source: Appliance Standards Awareness Project 1/16/15

Regulations matter
According to the Edison Foundation Institute for Electric Innovation (IEI), fixed-cost recovery mechanisms play a significant role in supporting electric efficiency. The 2014 IEI report You are leaving WAPA.gov. found that investment in energy efficiency depends on state policies that allow utilities to pursue efficiency as a sustainable business as well as state mandates for energy efficiency.

Fixed-cost recovery mechanisms, such as decoupling and lost revenue adjustment, help a utility recover the marginal revenue associated with fixed operating costs. Utilities appear to be more willing to invest in programs to reduce energy use if state regulations allow them to recoup their losses.

The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) bolsters the IEI report, with nine of the top 10 states on its 2014 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard You are leaving WAPA.gov. having a fixed-cost recovery mechanism.

Source: SmartWatt Energy News, 1/15/15

Dive into hot water
Drought will continue to be a major concern in 2015, so events that focus on water use may well become the hot ticket. The ACEEE Hot Water Forum Redirecting to a non-government site (HWF) is now in its sixth year of gathering experts to discuss making water hot, distributing it with low losses, and employing efficient fixtures and practices. Professionals from manufacturing; distribution (plumbing); electricity, gas and water utilities; government; and the research communities will meet in Nashville, Tennessee, Feb. 22-24 to learn from each other and build momentum for market transformation.

The conference emphasizes both the technical efficiency potential and the policy implications of service hot water technology and practices, and how people use hot water. In recent years, key topics have included:

  • Standards and rating methods
  • Grid-interactive electric water heating
  • All about heat pump water heaters
  • The latest in innovative technologies
  • Efforts to improve residential water heating efficiency
  • An international perspective on water heating

Utilities still have a great deal to learn about the water-energy nexus  and its potential for cost and resource savings.

Since 2008, this conference has provided a venue for all members of the hot water community to collaborate and share new ideas.

Source: American Council for and Energy Efficient Economy, 1/17/15

Learn something new
If professional development is on your list of resolutions, check out the pre-conference training sessions that kick off the National Conference of the Association for Energy Services ProfessionalsRedirecting to a non-government site (AESP) in Orlando, Florida, Feb. 9-12.

The sessions include:

  • Behavior Change and Energy Efficiency Programs
  • Intro to the Principles of EM&V (Evaluation, Measurement and Verification)
  • Leadership Training for Exceptional Team Performance

The fee for each course is $545, and continuing education units will be available. You don’t have to attend the conference to take advantage of the workshops, but AESP events are always great for networking and expanding your horizons.

Source: Association for Energy Services Professionals, 1/14/15

Get recognition
Submit your successful peak load and demand response management programs, initiatives and achievements for the 12th annual PLMA Awards Redirecting to a non-government site. The Peak Load Management Alliance (PLMA) is accepting nominations through March 2 for the following categories:

  • Program Pacesetter – recognizes outstanding programs that effectively support and deliver peak load management
  • Technology Pioneer – recognizes innovative applications of technology with demonstrated potential to scale
  • Outstanding Thought Leader – recognizes the impact of projects, outreach campaigns and individual contributions that have the potential to shape the industry’s future

You don’t have to be a PLMA member to nominate a program, and self-nominations are appropriate. One or more awards will be presented in each category with sub-categories for Utilities, Regulators, Independent System Operator/Regional Transmission Operator, Aggregator, Marketer, Consumer, Solutions Provider, Manufacturer, Individual, Organization or Project.

The awards will be presented at the 16th PLMA Spring Conference Redirecting to a non-government site, April 28-29, 2015, in Tucson, Arizona.

If you are interested in joining PLMA, the nonprofit now offers membership in three tiers. Utilities and other program providers may now join as associate, advising or sustaining members. Membership offers access to networking events and training, and the opportunity to participate in committees and working groups at various levels.

PLMA provides resources and advocacy for organizations involved in demand response initiatives, recently announced a change to its membership structure.

Source: Peak Load Management Alliance, 1/16/15

Energy Services is always on the lookout for information to help our customers cope with the challenges of delivering power in a changing industry. Feel free to share news items about events, programs, policies and technology that your utility finds useful.

Data, coordination needed to unlock energy savings in water conservation

The water-energy nexus has received more attention lately, especially from Western customers grappling with long-term drought in their service territory. We understand the connection between the two resources: Producing electricity requires water, and moving, treating and re-treating water requires energy. Undoubtedly, there are opportunities to create cross-cutting conservation strategies, but so far, utilities and policymakers have paid little attention.

Watts in a Drop of Water: Savings at the Water-Energy Nexus,Redirecting to a non-government site a new paper from the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE), seeks to quantify the water-energy nexus across a range of energy intensities for water and wastewater services. It also examines the potential avoided energy consumption from water efficiency programs and provides estimates of the possible energy savings.

One barrier to creating a program template or sharing best practices is that the range of water’s energy intensity varies widely from system to system. This is largely due to differences in size of the water systems, pumping requirements between geographic locations and raw water characteristics. Drawing from existing data, the paper develops national estimates of energy savings associated with conserving water throughout the processes of conveyance, heating and water and sewage treatment. The data show a dramatic range of energy intensity, particularly in the water service sector (source, conveyance and treatment).

Another problem the paper identifies is that there is a lack of raw data on energy use by water and wastewater facilities across the country. Traditionally, energy and water utilities have siloed priorities, focusing only on delivering their respective products.

However, with increased interest in using energy efficiency to meet greenhouse gas and other pollutant standards, utilities and air regulators should be looking for every opportunity to achieve greater savings. The authors found that some local and state jurisdictions are seeking better documentation of water-energy interactions to facilitate more integrated program development and evaluation.

ACEEE concludes that there is a big opportunity for savings, but much more work needed to achieve them. Utilities and regulators need more data along, with solid methods to calculate energy savings from water conservation. If energy and water utilities are willing to collaborate on innovative projects, the benefits, particularly in states facing severe droughts,Redirecting to a non-government site would be huge.

ACEEE: Combined heat and power should be part of EPA clean power plan

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its plan in June for cutting carbon pollution from power plants by 2030, using four building blocks to achieve targeted reductions.

Each building block represents a category of measures that states can use to meet the first-ever federal regulation for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) from existing power plants. The agency included energy efficiency, creating a path for states to reduce both greenhouse gases and consumer energy bills, but overlooked combined heat and power (CHP). The American Council for an Energy-Efficient EconomyRedirecting to a non-government site noted that the readily available energy resource could provide states with substantial energy savings.

Block-worthy strategy
For the EPA to include a policy measure as a building block in its proposal, the energy savings it provides should be cost-effective, adequately demonstrated and there should be lots of it. CHP meets these criteria by providing both energy and environmental advantages over separate heat and power systems. An ACEEE study found CHP represents around 18 Gigawatts of avoided capacity, and that installing the technology could save more than 68 million Megawatt-hours of energy by 2030. Those energy savings could cut CO2 emissions and offset the need for about 36 power plants.

In addition to offering energy and environmental benefits, CHP is a well-established resource, widely in use in industrial facilities, hospitals and universities to reduce operating costs and ensure reliability. According to the Department of Energy, it currently represents 8 percent of installed U.S. electric generating capacity and more than 12 percent of total electricity generation, and has the potential to achieve much more. A study from Oak Ridge National Laboratory found CHP could reach up to 20 percent of U.S. generating capacity by 2030. Including CHP as a strategy for meeting CO2 reduction goals will encourage greater investment in the efficient technologies that deliver environmental and economic benefits.

States make their move
Another advantage of treating CHP as an energy efficiency measure is that it can provide emissions reductions at a lower cost than other sources. A handful of states, including New York, California, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and others, are developing innovative approaches to increase deployment of CHP to gain its energy savings and emissions benefits. ACEEE is urging EPA to encourage states to use CHP and provide guidance to help states include energy savings from CHP in their compliance plans. Source: American Council for and Energy Efficient Economy, 9/4/2014