Butler County REC tests water for solar energy

Iowa leads the nation in installed wind capacity—only Texas ranks higher—but lags at 34th for installed solar, leaving utilities like Butler County Rural Electric Cooperative You are leaving WAPA.gov. (REC) facing a learning curve. To fill in some of those knowledge gaps, the cooperative launched a demonstration project in late January that will allow it to collect data about solar energy and pass it on to its members.

Butler County REC chose a Duo High-Density system that features both north- and south-facing panels for maximum generation.

Butler County REC chose a Duo High-Density system that features both north- and south-facing panels for maximum generation. (Photo by Butler County Rural Electric Cooperative)

It was growing consumer interest that led to the project, according to Craig Codner, Butler County REC chief executive officer. “As our members continue in the direction of having more interest in renewable energy, we want to share accurate information with them,” he explained. “We want to help members make informed decisions.”

Putting it together
The exploration began with the selection of a 230.6 (kW) direct-current (DC)/147-kilowatt (kW) alternating-current solar array manufactured by Ten K Solar You are leaving WAPA.gov. of Minnesota. Codner said the co-op board chose the Duo High-Density system because it was designed for maximum energy generation and has an excellent warranty.

The system’s wave format features both north- and south-facing modules, increasing the opportunity for demand reduction. The north-facing modules will generate more electricity earlier and later in the day, while the south-facing units will produce higher amounts in the middle of the day, increasing the energy per square foot.

A crew from Western Iowa Power Cooperative installed the system at Butler County REC’s warehouse in Horton, north of Waverly, Iowa. The system is interconnected to Butler County REC’s distribution system with bi-directional metering, rather than net metering. The electricity offsets energy and demand at a rate contracted through Corn Belt PowerYou are leaving WAPA.gov. Butler County REC’s generation and transmission provider.

The co-op expects the arrays to generate about 268,000 kilowatt-hours per year, or enough to serve approximately 15 to 20 members annually. Members and co-op employees can monitor the solar project’s real-time output through a web-based kiosk.  You are leaving WAPA.gov. Codner said that there are plans to add an educational video to the website, as well. “One of the main reasons for the project is to help members understand solar better, how things like cloud cover or particulates in air affect capacity factor,” he explained.

Paying for experience
The project’s total cost of approximately two dollars per DC watt is partially funded by a $20,000 Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) grant, New Clean Renewable Energy Bond (CREB) financing and a federal tax credit.

This was the first time Butler County REC received REAP funding, offered through the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Applying for the REAP grant and for New CREB financing from the National Rural Co-op Finance Corporation You are leaving WAPA.gov. was a labor-intensive experience, Codner acknowledged. “I would advise co-ops to look carefully at all their financing options when they undertake a renewable energy project,” he said. “Self-financing avoids a lot of paperwork.”

Continuing renewables support
The new solar array may be Butler County REC’s first foray into utility-owned renewables, but the co-op has offered members the opportunity to support member-owned clean energy projects since 2006. The Energy Wise Renewables program initially supported only wind projects but has been expanded to include solar and other types of generation that enhance the traditional electric power supply. Codner estimates that there are 350 to 500 kW of solar interconnected to the co-op’s system.

Butler County REC is absorbing the solar project’s cost rather than using Energy Wise dollars to offset it, Codner added. “We decided that those dollars should go to member projects as originally intended,” he said.

Looking ahead
Now that the solar system is operational, Butler County REC is planning an open house to let members get a closer look at the project and ask questions. Codner is looking forward to testing manufacturer claims about the equipment and learning more about interconnection, operation and maintenance. “Safety—for members and our employees—is our No. 1 concern,” he stated.

If all goes well, the co-op board of directors is considering several possible locations for installing a second array in 2017. This second project may be a community solar initiative that would offer subscriptions for sale to members at a set rate for a certain period of time.

So far, the projects on Butler County REC’s system have been smaller ones that are most cost effective if the generation is consumed on site. But good customer service is about preparation and innovation. Butler County REC is taking steps today to make sure it is ready for whatever is coming tomorrow.

Source: In Touch newsletter, February 2017

DGIC announces new website, case studies, webinar schedule

Artwork by Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative

Utilities faced with questions posed by the growth of residential photovoltaic (PV) systems and the emergence of battery storage can find answers with the Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative (DGIC). This forum enables electric utilities, solar industry participants and other stakeholders to exchange best practices for distributed PV interconnection.

Now in its fourth year, the DGIC has updated its website to make it easier for visitors to find exactly what they are looking for. Content is organized by four topic areas:

  • Data transparency
  • Business models and regulation
  • Application processing
  • Analytical methods for interconnection
  • Technology solutions

Webinars, reports and blog articles are just a click away, and DGIC can easily add the latest research on distributed generation coming from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. You will want to bookmark the new website and visit regularly to check for updates.

Suggest case studies
Do you know of an organization doing high-quality, innovative work on the interconnection of distributed generation? You can nominate that organization to be profiled in a series of case studies DGIC is planning to produce. The case studies will extend DGIC’s peer exchange beyond the webinar format to highlight leading practices in the field.

Help DGIC identify industry leaders by submitting your nominations by April 30. The nomination form will remain open after that date but only nominations received by the deadline will be considered for completion in 2017.

Attend webinars
The DGIC webinar schedule for 2017 has been released and it showcases a diverse array of topics and expert speakers from utilities, research organizations and other industry participants.

The peer exchange events begin April 5 with Energy Storage Permitting, Interconnection, and AnalysisYou are leaving WAPA.gov. This webinar will focus on one of the most talked about and fastest growing distributed energy resources in the country. This relatively new technology has the ability to act as both a load and a generator, posing unique challenges when interconnecting to the grid. Attendees will learn about permitting, interconnection requirements, and the specific analytical needs of energy storage systems.

Distributed Solar for Smaller UtilitiesYou are leaving WAPA.gov. on May 18, will highlight the experiences of smaller utilities that are shifting their business processes, staffing, planning and operations to integrate distributed solar into their systems.

The July 19 webinar, Plug-and-Play SolarYou are leaving WAPA.gov. will discuss new technologies and techniques that could reduce equipment and labor costs, but may require changes to interconnection standards and procedures.

The webinar series concludes in September with Aggregation of Distributed Energy Resources which will feature lessons learned from utilities exploring the possibility of putting a variety of distributed resources under unified operational control. The date and registration information for this webinar will be announced later this year.

All scheduled webinars will be presented from 12 to 1 P.M. Mountain Time. There is no cost to participate, but registration is required.

Source: The Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative, 2/24/17

EPTC launches new registration system

Signing up for a quality training course at WAPA’s Electric Power Training Center is now easier than ever. The EPTC is implementing a new, streamlined registration process with RegOnline, an event management platform.

EPTC instructor J Agee teaches a class on power plant operations. Attendees put their knowledge to work in problem solving exercises on the Miniature Power System.

EPTC instructor J Agee teaches a class on power plant operations. Attendees put their knowledge to work in problem solving exercises on the Miniature Power System. (Photo by Travis Weger, Western Area Power Administration)

The EPTC offers one-of-a-kind power system operations training in Golden, Colorado. Courses cover the principles and operation of power generation, transmission and interconnected system operations complete with unique, hands-on exercises with powerful simulation tools.

The North American Electric Reliability Corporation You are leaving WAPA.gov. recognizes the EPTC as a continuing education provider that adheres to NERC Continuing Education Program Criteria. “However, our comprehensive range of courses can benefit everyone from power plant operators to support staff,” said Randy Manion, acting EPTC program manager.

The new registration system enables attendees to pay for courses online—a previously unavailable option—and provides EPTC and students with an emailed receipt. Here is how the new system works:

  • On the grid listing all available training courses, click the “register” button to the right of the chosen class.
  • Fill in your email and hit continue.
  • Fill in your personal information including your supervisor’s email and your regional block code. There is a space at the bottom of the form for those completing it on behalf of another employee. Hit “Add another person” or “Continue.”
  • Scroll down the checkout screen and hit the “Finish” button. Unless you select “Finish,” you will not be registered.

The system will then send you an invoice with payment details, and send confirmation to the EPTC.

Please let us know if you have any difficulties with RegOnline, or any suggestions to improve the experience.

DGIC: Key Outcomes of NREL’s Utility Technical Assistance Program

Dec. 8, 2016
12:00–1:30 p.m. MT

The quarterly meeting of the Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative highlights the experiences of two utilities who applied for and received assistance from the DOE’s Utility Solar Technical Assistance program pilot. Register today You are leaving WAPA.gov. to learn about two of these in-depth projects:

  • Financial viability of co-located solar-plus-storage facilities in Pasadena, California
  • Project finance for community solar in the U.S. Midwest

The technical assistance recipients and NREL subject matter experts will discuss the key outcomes and lessons learned from these experiences.

Source: WAPA Renewable Energy Program, 12/1/16

Imperial Irrigation District brings 33-MW battery storage system online

California once again showed its leadership in integrating battery storage into the electricity grid last month, when Imperial Irrigation District You are leaving WAPA.gov. (IID) commissioned one of the largest battery energy storage systems (BESS) in the North America.

Imperial Irrigation District built a new substation to accommodate the battery energy storage system near its El Centro gas generating plant

Imperial Irrigation District built a new substation to accommodate the battery energy storage system near its El Centro gas generating plant. (Photo by Imperial Irrigation District)

Representatives from IID joined Coachella Energy Storage Partners (CESP), electric industry leaders and local and state officials, Oct. 26, to launch the 33-megawatt (MW), 20-megawatt-hour (MWh) system. IID installed the lithium-ion BESS to increase reliability while integrating renewable energy resources into the local grid. The storage system allows the utility to balance power, arrest frequency decay, provide spinning reserve, mitigate large fluctuations of energy, increase voltage stability and deliver “black start” power restoration capabilities for the nearby El Centro gas generation plant. A black start is the process of restoring an electric power station or a part of an electric grid to operation without relying on the external transmission network.

Integration poses challenges
The dedication ceremony was the culmination of more than three years of assessment and planning.

Like many utilities, IID is feeling the pressure of increasing amounts of renewables on its electric system. Those pressures are likely to grow as the state pushes toward its goal of a 50-percent renewable energy supply by 2030, especially since IID is located in such a resource-rich area. IID’s grid already carries 900 MW of clean energy—mostly geothermal and solar—with another 1,200 MW of new generation seeking to interconnect to its system.

“Specifically, the integration of solar generation was affecting our balancing authority, and our control performance standard began to suffer,” said Jesse Montaño, IID manager of planning and engineering.

Battery storage was a cost-effective solution to address ramp, regulation, capacity, ancillary services, system reliability and power quality. It is also environmentally friendly because smoothing the power supply and providing a spinning reserve are functions usually performed by expensive fossil fuel generation.

Putting pieces in place
After settling on the appropriate battery storage solution, IID issued a bond and drew on its capital spending budget to finance the $38 million project.

CESP won the district’s solicitation for 20 to 40 MW of grid-scale energy storage, beating out eight other vendors in the final round to serve as general contractor for the project. The company chose the energy project management company ZGlobal Inc. You are leaving WAPA.gov. to oversee construction and General Electric to build the system.

GE supplied a comprehensive package which includes the lithium-ion battery with its inverters, plant controls, transformers and medium-voltage switchgear in a single enclosure. This is one of GE’s largest energy storage projects to date and one of its few lithium-ion storage projects. The company recently rebooted its lithium-ion battery business and also won a contract in April for an 8-MWh battery energy storage system for Con Edison Development You are leaving WAPA.gov. in Central Valley, California.

Now playing
Construction took about one year to complete, demonstrating that a storage battery can be sited and deployed relatively easily. However, every system is different and poses its own challenges to integration. “The BESS replaces some of our need for spinning reserves, but it was continually reacting to mitigate the slow ramping capabilities of IID’s generation fleet,” said Montaño. “We had to adjust reaction parameters on the BESS in order to economically and reliably balance the system.”

Testing followed so that when the BESS came online in October, it was ready to provide benefits to IID and its customers. On top of the operational benefits of increasing reliability and bringing more flexibility to the utility’s system, the BESS offers economic advantages, as well. It enables load shifting that reduces the need for expensive spinning reserves and is expected to result in significant cost savings to rate payers over the life of the project.

Every utility has a different power mix and different load, so battery storage must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. But IID’s project illustrates many of the technology’s potential benefits and should give power providers elsewhere in the country much to think about.

Source: Public Power Daily, 10/31/16

MRES, city of Pierre launch first South Dakota solar farm

The largest solar farm in South Dakota began producing electricity for Missouri River Energy Services You are leaving WAPA.gov. (MRES) customers, Sept. 30, after officials cut the ribbon on the one-megawatt (MW) array at the Pierre Regional Airport.

Pierre Utilities Director Brad Palmer (left) and Lead Lineman Devin Harris take a moment to enjoy a job well done. Harris was instrumental in tying the airport solar project to the city's distribution system.

Pierre Utilities Director Brad Palmer (left) and Lead Lineman Devin Harris take a moment to enjoy a job well done. Harris was instrumental in tying the airport solar project to the city’s distribution system.

The solar photovoltaic project, a joint effort by MRES, the city of Pierre You are leaving WAPA.gov. and Geronimo Energy You are leaving WAPA.gov. of Edina, Minnesota, covers 9 acres and will generate enough electricity to power 200 homes.

MRES CEO Tom Heller acknowledged that while the facility was significant for the state, it was nevertheless intended only as a demonstration project. “It’s not large. It’s the first one we’ve done. We just want to see what it will do,” Heller said in an interview with a local newspaper.

Identifying partners
That does not mean that bringing the project to completion was a simple task, however. “It doesn’t matter if the project is 1 MW or 100 MW, you have the same number of parts from planning perspective,” explained Jeff Peters, MRES director of federal and distributed power programs. “The sheer number of stakeholders who need to be engaged makes the process daunting.”

Peters ticked off a list that included environmental groups, Native American tribes, the Federal Aviation Administration, city and state regulators and the transmission provider (WAPA). “Even the local newspaper could be considered a stakeholder,” he pointed out. “You have to make sure you identify all of the interested parties and keep them updated on your progress.”

The distribution provider—Pierre Municipal Utilities—was on board with the project from the beginning. “Overall, the community was very much in favor of the project and excited to be hosting the largest solar facility in the state,” said Utilities Director Brad Palmer.

Geronimo Energy, developer and owner of “Pierre Solar LLC,” was another piece of the puzzle that slotted in easily. MRES has a relationship with the company that includes power purchase agreements for the output of two wind energy facilities in Minnesota. The innovative 25-year contract Geronimo structured reduced costs for MRES versus a more traditional deal. The entire output of the solar project will become part of MRES’s wholesale power supply for the benefit of its 60 member communities.

Building easier, not easy
After conducting a solar feasibility study with Geronimo in 2015, MRES chose Pierre for its first solar project.

As a solar site, the Pierre Regional Airport offered many advantages, including a surprisingly high number of sun days and its status as a brownfield. “MRES didn’t want to use any cropland for the demonstration, or property that had residential or commercial potential,” explained Joni Livingston, MRES director of communications and member services.

The proposed site also boasted a southward slope with no obstructions and no need to build transmission. “This was a ‘behind the meter’ installation,” said Peters.

Palmer noted that the location was about as close to a substation as you can get, making it easy to tie into the city’s distribution system. The biggest challenge, he added, came in the form of paperwork. “The FAA [Federal Aviation Administration] had several requirements, including a “glint and glare” study,” Palmer noted. “Another wrinkle is that the Department of Defense was the previous owner of the airport. There were some strings attached when they deeded it to the city, so that added to the authorizations we needed. Eventually, everyone signed off, so it wasn’t so much a barrier as it was just a matter of lengthy application process.”

Partners and stakeholders turned out in force to cut the ribbon on South Dakota's first utility-scale solar farm. From left: Hunter Roberts, assistant energy director, South Dakota Governor's Office; Jeff Peters, director of federal & distributed power programs, Missouri River Energy Services; Harold Schiebout, president, MRES board of directors; Pierre Mayor Laurie Gill; Tom Heller, MRES CEO; Noel Rahn, chairman of Geronimo Energy; and Leon Schochenmaier, city administrator, Pierre Municipal Utilities. Read more.

Partners and stakeholders turned out in force to cut the ribbon on South Dakota’s first utility-scale solar farm. From left: Hunter Roberts, assistant energy director, South Dakota Governor’s Office; Jeff Peters, director of federal & distributed power programs, Missouri River Energy Services; Harold Schiebout, president, MRES board of directors; Pierre Mayor Laurie Gill; Tom Heller, MRES CEO; Noel Rahn, chairman of Geronimo Energy; and Leon Schochenmaier, city administrator, Pierre Municipal Utilities. Read more. (Photo by ©2016. Patrick Callahan).

Up, running
Now that the Pierre Solar LLC has been operational for a few weeks, MRES is just beginning the learning phase of its demonstration. “We are hoping to learn more about interconnecting with the local distribution system, and the array’s effect on the community’s power quality and reliability,” Livingston said. “We will be watching to see how much electricity it produces and at what time of day and how that relates to peak demand. Once we have that information, it may lead to more solar installations.”

Palmer pointed out that there is room at the Pierre Regional Airport for the solar array to expand. He likes the idea of utility-scale and community solar as a way of giving customers more clean energy. “From the utility standpoint, it is easier to integrate and safer for our workers,” Palmer acknowledged. “The economy of scale also makes it more cost effective for the consumers.”

For Peters, the lessons so far are holistic rather than technical. “Each project is different, so you will learn something new with each one,” he said. “The planning process can always improve.”

Free webinars explore community solar issues

Community plus Storage Solutions
Sept. 29, 12 p.m. CDT

As more utilities install projects that allow customers to get their own “piece of the sun,” new approaches and new challenges keep arising. You can learn more about designing solar projects and creating community solar programs by attending a free webinar series presented by the Community Solar Value Project You are leaving WAPA.gov. (CSVP).

The 2016 lunchtime webinars explore innovations expected to grow quickly in the utility-driven community-solar market. The CSVP team invites guest experts to discuss better solar project design and procurement; strategies to manage solar variability, such as demand response and storage companion measures; program design for targeted customer appeals and win-win programs for low-income communities.

The hot trend of Community plus Storage Solutions You are leaving WAPA.gov. is the topic of the Sept. 29 webinar. While the idea of integrating storage options directly into community solar gardens has been slow to gain traction, a few innovative utilities and third parties have begun to explore such designs on both sides of the utility meter. Find out how industry leaders are facilitating renewables integration in communities around the world. A discussion with provocative what-if questions will follow the presentations.

Shortly after each webinar, either a video or slides in PDF format are posted to the CSVP archive. You can also find webinar recordings from the 2015 series.

The two remaining webinars remaining in the 2016 series are:

  • Thursday October 27 – The Value of Going Local.
  • Thursday December 1 – Smarter Procurement for Community Solar Solutions.

The webinars take place at 12 p.m. Central Time.

Source: Community Solar Value Project, 9/15/16

Tribal solar farm breaks new ground for Navajo Nation

The Navajo Nation, WAPA’s largest tribal customer, is about to join the ranks of utility-scale renewable energy producers with the construction of a 27.5-megawatt (MW) solar farm at Kayenta, Arizona.

Residents of surrounding communities, tribal leaders and officials from the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority attended the groundbreaking ceremony for the Kayenta Solar Farm near WAPA's Kayenta Substation in Arizona.

Residents of surrounding communities, tribal leaders and officials from the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority attended the groundbreaking ceremony for the Kayenta Solar Farm near WAPA’s Kayenta Substation in Arizona. (Photo by Travis Weger, WAPA Public Affairs specialist)

WAPA Administrator and CEO Mark A. Gabriel and Chief Public Affairs Officer Teresa Plant attended the groundbreaking ceremony on the Navajo Nation, April 23. Also joining the ceremony were residents of surrounding communities, tribal leaders and officials from the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority, You are leaving WAPA.gov. the primary power provider for the tribe.

The new facility, the largest Native-owned renewable project in the country, is expected to be operational by spring 2017. “We are excited to show that the Navajo Nation can develop an energy project on this scale,” said Deenise Becenti, NTUA spokesperson.

Many reasons to build
In addition to valuable experience, the solar farm will also provide power to a northern section of the Navajo Nation at some of the “lowest consumer electric rates in the region,” according to an NTUA press release. This is significant because of all the Native households in the U.S. that do not have electric power, 75 percent are in the Navajo Nation.

Other benefits of the project include promoting grid modernization and economic development. Construction will require about 100 workers, and there are expected to be five permanent jobs managing the facility. “It may not sound like much,” Becenti acknowledged, “but on the average, each employed tribe member helps to support eight others.”

She added that some people who have left the area to find jobs will be able to return home.

Partnering to reach goals
NTUA has taken the lead on developing the $64 million project, working out an agreement with Salt River Project You are leaving WAPA.gov. for the energy credits. SRP’s purchase of two years’ worth of energy and environmental attributes from the Kayenta Solar Farm is helping to fund its construction. The project is also receiving tax credits and loans, mainly from the Cooperative Finance Corporation, You are leaving WAPA.gov. a finance cooperative run by a network of electric cooperatives.

The purchase of the attributes will help SRP meet its goal of getting 20 percent of its retail energy requirements from sustainable resources by 2020. The Arizona-based public power provider contracted in 2012 to buy renewable energy certificates from solar arrays NTUA rents to low-income customers who do not have access to electricity. NTUA also sells SRP the credits from small solar installations on some utility facilities.

Bringing a large-scale renewable energy project to the Navajo Nation has been a long-time goal of the tribal utility, said NTUA General Manager Walter Hasse in a recent interview. “It is an important next step in the development of a green economy for the Navajo Nation,” he stated.

WAPA pitches in
The solar farm will be connecting to the larger grid through WAPA’s Kayenta Substation. WAPA has a long-standing relationship with NTUA, and has cooperated with the 55-year-old tribal utility on past projects.

At the groundbreaking ceremony, Gabriel said, “We hope to continue building this kind of mutually beneficial partnership well into the future, especially with our Native American customers. Changes in the electric industry are occurring rapidly and WAPA stands ready to continue providing technical assistance in power marketing, resource management and transmission services for the Navajo Nation.”

Source: WAPA Closed Circuit, June 2016

Free webinar discusses valuation of distributed energy resources

Aug. 17
12 p.m. MT

As distributed energy resources (DER) become more prevalent, states across the country are seeking to design consistent and durable valuation and compensation schemes for these resources. What’s a Watt Worth? presents three novel approaches to valuing distributed energy resources (DER) from California, New York and Texas. Speakers will cover locational valuation of DER and DER in wholesale markets, locational net benefits analysis of distribution resource plans and distribution-level markets for DER.

The Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative (DGIC) aims to share knowledge on distributed photovoltaic interconnection practices and innovation. Register You are leaving WAPA.gov. for this free webinar and sign up to receive quarterly updates on DGIC activities.

Source: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 8/8/16

Free webinar explores potential of carports for community solar

Aug 18, 2016
11:00 AM MDT

The Community Solar Value Project You are leaving WAPA.gov.  will present Making Solar Carports Happen, You are leaving WAPA.gov. a free webinar, on Aug. 18 at 11 a.m. Mountain Time.

Carports add value to parking spaces by providing shade and shelter, and they are usually located in areas with wide-open solar exposure and easy grid access. This could make the structures an excellent design option for community solar gardens that also promote grid-managed electric vehicle charging.

Learn more about all the benefits, as well as the pricing challenges, associated with solar carports and shade structures by joining the CSVP August webinar. Presentations will feature two leading solar carport providers and cover highlights from CSVP’s solar carport market update.

Making Solar Carports Happen is part of a free webinar series that launched June 30 with Can Regulation Make Community Solar Better? Past webinar presentations are available in the CSVP library, along with presentations from other events related to community solar. Upcoming webinars include:

  • September 29 – Community Solar Plus Storage Solutions
  • October 27 – Smarter Procurement for Community Solar Programs

Watch Energy Services Bulletin for more information about registration.

The Community Solar Value Project represents leading energy thinkers and do-ers, ready to “make community solar better,” from both the sponsoring-utility and customer perspective. Focusing on strategic solar technologies, siting and design, and on integrating companion measures, such as demand-response and storage, into program designs, CSVP aims to address solar variability and minimize costs for service and distribution. Developing the market for the community solar model is also a goal of the project.

Extensible Energy, LLC, a San Francisco-area energy consulting and analytics firm, leads the project, with support from Cliburn and Associates, LLC, Olivine, Inc., and Navigant Consulting. WAPA customer Sacramento Municipal Utility District You are leaving WAPA.gov. and Public Service of New Mexico are among the utilities participating nationwide. The project is powered by the Department of Energy SunShot Initiative under its Solar Market Pathways program. Sunshot is also a sponsor of the webinar series.

Source: Community Solar Value Project, 7/28/16