Office of Indian Energy internship program builds technical expertise

Students learn about different types of solar panels and arrays during the July 2016 Ute Mountain Ute Youth Energy Day in Colorado, hosted by the DOE Office of Indian Energy as part of its efforts to promote STEM education in tribal communities. The event is one of many education and training opportunities the Office of Indian Energy offers to tribes.

Students learn about different types of solar panels and arrays during the July 2016 Ute Mountain Ute Youth Energy Day in Colorado, hosted by the DOE Office of Indian Energy as part of its efforts to promote STEM education in tribal communities. The event is one of many education and training opportunities the Office of Indian Energy offers to tribes. (Photo by DOE Office of Indian Energy)

An educated and technically skilled workforce is paramount to the development of tribal energy resources and the protection of tribal lands. The Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy’s college student summer internship program has cultivated that workforce for more than 16 years.

Current full-time undergraduates and graduate students who are familiar with Native American culture and tribal issues apply to support Office of Indian Energy-funded projects in the field and at DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories. During the 12-week internship, interns work with cross-disciplinary teams to receive hands-on experience and gain valuable knowledge about numerous energy technologies. This helps to build awareness in the tribal community around important energy issues and research while bringing technically skilled Native Americans into the workforce.

Half of the interns who have completed their degrees work in tribal positions, including one who is the renewable energy engineer for WAPA customer, the Navajo Tribal Utility AuthorityYou are leaving WAPA.gov. Another 33 percent hold jobs in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields outside their tribes.

Graduates spread awareness
Recently, Chelsea Chee, a former intern and member of the Navajo Nation, received the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity Rising Star award for leadership across several major projects in New Mexico. The award recognizes individuals at the beginning of their career who have demonstrated exemplary leadership traits promoting access, equity and diversity in education and the workforce.

One of the accomplishments that earned the honor for Chee began with an idea she had as an intern in the class of 2011-2013. She created the Natives In STEM You are leaving WAPA.gov. program through her current position as the diversity and inclusion coordinator for New Mexico’s Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research. “It wouldn’t have been possible if [my mentors and supervisors] hadn’t supported my work and my ideas, some of which were different,” Chee said. “But they trusted me and supported me and helped me turn those ideas into fruition.”

Chee’s initiative brings visibility to Native American STEM professionals, inspiring students of all backgrounds to pursue STEM careers. Now co-led with American Indian Science and Engineering Society You are leaving WAPA.gov., the project has distributed more than 4,500 posters that feature five Native STEM professionals, including to 137 Bureau of Indian Education schools, 14 tribal colleges and universities, and tribal libraries across the country. Chee is also active in the larger equity community at the state and national levels.

Inclusion matters
The importance of internships and programs like Natives in STEM for increasing diversity in technical fields cannot be understated. According to the National Science Foundation, American Indians or Alaska Natives hold just 0.2 percent of science and engineering occupations, and represent only 0.3 percent of highest degree-holders in S&E fields.

Especially to young people, it can make a world of difference to know that others from their community have followed a path that may seem beyond reach. Chee recalled that one of the reasons she applied to the internship program was Sandra Begay, the internship coordinator and principal member of the Sandia Lab technical staff. Begay was the first Navajo woman Chee met who was connected to STEM and became an instant mentor to the intern.

Since completing her internship five years ago, Chee has become a voice for tribal inclusion in STEM settings and has taken part in equity conversations at state and local levels throughout New Mexico. She pointed out that people from rural areas—tribal and otherwise—often cannot get to Albuquerque to take part in STEM-related conversations. “It is important to have that input,” she said.

Chee continues to make inclusion her mission, adding that the Indian Energy program and internship were instrumental for her. “It was one of the best, if not the best, internship programs I’ve ever been a part of,” she stated.

Participate in Indian Energy programs
The 2018 internship program placed interns on projects such as on- and off-grid photovoltaic installations and a distributed energy resource system comprising large PV array, micro-turbine, fuel cell and large battery bank. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a grade point average of 3.0 for undergraduates and 4.0 for graduate students. Learn more about the application process and past interns on the Office of Indian Energy website.

In addition to the internship program, the Office of Indian Energy provides education and training opportunities, including regional workshops, webinars, Tribal Leader Forums, a comprehensive online training curriculum and an energy resource library. WAPA cosponsors the Tribal Energy Webinar series to help the diverse tribal communities evaluate and prioritize their energy options.

Source: DOE Office of Indian Energy blog, 5/29/18

Efficient electrification worth talking about

According to EPRI, the key to efficient electrification is an integrated energy network that gives grid operators more resources to draw upon for balancing supply- and demand-side resources.

According to EPRI, the key to efficient electrification is an integrated energy network that gives grid operators more resources to draw upon for balancing supply- and demand-side resources. (Artwork by Electric Power Research Institute)

The Electric Power Research Institute recently launched its Efficient Electrification Initiative You are leaving WAPA.gov. to analyze the impacts of electrifying the end use of energy, where it makes sense from an efficiency standpoint.

In an article in the EPRI JournalYou are leaving WAPA.gov. President and CEO Mike Howard drew a distinction between the original meaning of electrification—extending electrical service to people who lacked it—and EPRI’s demonstration program. Efficient electrification, Howard explained, looks to integrate the energy network to help achieve the most efficient use of energy and the cleanest production, delivery and consumption of that energy.

As defined in EPRI’s U.S. National Electrification Assessment, electrification refers to the adoption of electric end-use technologies to displace other commercial energy forms and provide new services. According to the assessment, electrification yields benefits to the economy that include:

  • Lower-cost power
  • Lower energy use
  • Reduced air emissions and water use
  • Improved health and safety for workers, potentially leading to gains in productivity and product quality
  • Greater grid flexibility and efficiency

More uses, less consumption
Among the assessment’s key findings is the expectation that electricity’s share of final energy consumption will grow from 21 percent today to 32–47 percent in 2050. Transportation—for personal vehicles and for commercial truck fleets and other heavier-duty applications—accounts for a large share of this growth. Advanced heat pumps, industrial process equipment and other technologies will also contribute to that increase.

The analysis considers regulatory and economic barriers and points to opportunities for financing, recalling how rural electrification financing enabled technology that dramatically increased farm production. In the 21st century, indoor agriculture through electrified production of crops could sharply reduce water and other resource consumption, Howard asserted.

Balancing act with benefits
One surprising fact that emerged from EPRI’s analysis is that even as electricity use increases, the overall use of energy decreases, hence the pairing of “efficient” with “electrification.” The entire energy system would become more efficient through efficient electrotechnologies, and become cleaner as it uses less energy to do the same work.

The efficient electrification scenario makes the entire system more dynamic, too. As more applications rely on electricity, grid operators have more resources to manage and draw upon for balancing supply- and demand-side resources.

Discover possibilities
To move the conversation about electrification forward, EPRI is hosting the inaugural Electrification 2018 International Conference & Exposition You are leaving WAPA.gov. Aug. 20-23 in Long Beach, California. Manufacturers, policymakers, academia, researchers, utility professionals and more will come together to explore the potential for electrifying at the point of end use.

This is an excellent opportunity to find out where electrification is today and where it could go tomorrow. Attendees will see the latest technologies in action and learn about the quantifiable benefits of electrification for consumers and the environment. Utilities and vendors will share cutting-edge practices from innovative programs they have implemented.

Now is the time for power providers to be talking about efficient electrification. Utilities that are ready to address the challenges and seize the opportunities can become leaders in efficiency, sustainability, service and customer satisfaction. Learn more about the conference You are leaving WAPA.gov. and don’t forget to share your stories with WAPA.

Source: EPRI Journal, 5/17/18

Fort Collins Utilities awarded 2018 Green Building of the Year

Colorado's first facility to achieve a LEED v.4 Platinum rating, the Fort Collins Utilities Administrative Building is the first phase of an efficient new civic campus planned for Downtown Fort Collins.

Colorado’s first facility to achieve a LEED v.4 Platinum rating, the Fort Collins Utilities Administrative Building is the first phase of an efficient new civic campus planned for Downtown Fort Collins. (Photo by City of Fort Collins)

The United States Green Building Council You are leaving WAPA.gov. recently recognized WAPA customer Fort Collins Utilities’ You are leaving WAPA.gov. Administration Building with the Mountain West Region 2018 Colorado Green Building of the Year award.

Fort Collins Utilities was honored along with other award recipients May 3 at the Rocky Mountain Green Conference You are leaving WAPA.gov.  in Denver.

Sustainable architecture firm Stantec You are leaving WAPA.gov. designed the Administrative Building to embody the community values demonstrated by Fort Collins energy and climate policies, and to document these high performance goals with Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Version 4. You are leaving WAPA.gov. Construction was completed in 2016, and accolades followed quickly. The building also earned an ENERGY STAR® score of 100 for operations in 2017.

The facility was the first in Colorado and fourth in the world to receive the Platinum designation under the latest version of the LEED standard. In addition to being one of the most energy-efficient buildings in the state, more than 95 percent of the construction waste was diverted from landfills. It features a 104-kilowatt solar system, and the city is currently reviewing designs to add a storage battery later this year.

Shoot for gold, hit platinum
The request for proposals called for the building to achieve a minimum of a LEED Gold rating under the new LEED v.4 standard, which has a more performance-based approach than previous versions. “The architecture went through a lot of iterations—in square footage, budget and so forth—but the specificity of the goals we set for the project in the RFP kept the design and construction team on track,” said John Phelan, Fort Collins Energy Services manager.

The city required the design and construction team to achieve all of the energy and atmosphere points to ensure ongoing performance, and challenged the team in other areas to achieve the certification. The choice to apply LEED v.4 presented the city with some challenges. For example, Phelan recalled that the materials category has new methodology and standards so the updated material data sheets were not always available. “That made it hard for the contracting team to get the necessary documentation,” he explained.

The integrated approach produced some clear triumphs as well. The design team focused on a well-insulated, tight envelope with extensive daylighting, resulting in a building with extraordinary light quality and views. “If you are not in a bathroom or closet, you can see the sky,” Phelan proudly stated.

Sustainability quest continues
The Utilities Administration Building is the first phase of an efficient new civic campus planned for Downtown Fort Collins. The master plan calls for the buildings clustered in a two-block area to be heated and cooled by a shared geothermal well field. Designers prepared the new building for that eventuality. It was designed to be able to connect the district heating system, promising an even better energy performance in the future.

Energy isn’t the only kind of performance the city is planning to measure. In an effort to understand the value of indoor environmental quality of this building, occupants have taken pre- and post-construction surveys on their comfort, satisfaction and how they feel about their work environment. Ultimately, annual utility bills are very small compared to the utility’s investment in its employees, explained Phelan. “You can’t lose sight of the fact that you are building for the people who work inside, doing the work that the community wants,” he said.

WAPA congratulates Fort Collins Utilities for another achievement in sustainability. The forward-thinking municipal utility has made great strides in lowering its carbon intensity, and never rests in pursuing more innovative solutions.

WAPA customers receive USDA Rural Development loans

Electric cooperatives WAPA serves in Colorado, Iowa and Minnesota are among the utilities receiving $276 million in guaranteed loans (PDF, 60 KB) from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to improve system efficiency and reliability. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced the investments in a March 13 press release the day before appearing at a Senate hearing on rebuilding American infrastructure. Loans are also going to utilities in Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio and Virginia.

USDA Rural Development’s Electric Program provides loan guarantees to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. Rural Development assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community services such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. These are the kinds of projects that could make the areas more inviting to new businesses, the people the businesses would need to fill jobs.

Improving transmission, more
The transmission system of Minnesota Valley Cooperative Light & Power Association You are leaving WAPA.gov. will get 52 miles of new lines, 14 miles of improvements and $560,000 in smart grid upgrades as part of a $10,569,000 Rural Development loan. The co-op provides electric service to more than 5,200 consumers over 3,273 miles of line in eight counties with primarily agriculture-based economies. Small commercial loads account for 10 percent of kilowatt-hour sales. Large commercial accounts, including an ethanol plant, cheese production facility and casino, account for the remaining kWh sales and revenue.

Southeast Colorado Power Association You are leaving WAPA.gov. will use $13,000,000 in Rural Development funds to build 72 miles of line, improve 125 miles and make other system improvements. A member of Tri-State Generation and Transmission, You are leaving WAPA.gov. the La Junta-based co-op serves 7,688 residential, nearly 1,500 irrigation and 1,100 commercial consumers across a 13,000-square-mile service territory that covers 11 Colorado counties.

“This funding will allow SECPA to advance important infrastructure efforts and provide reliable, affordable electricity essential to sustaining the economic well-being and quality of life for rural Coloradans,” said Sallie Clark, USDA Rural Development Colorado state director.

Southwest Iowa Rural Electric Cooperative You are leaving WAPA.gov. will receive a $6,100,000 loan to build 69 miles of line, upgrade 96 miles and make other system improvements, including $775,000 for smart grid projects. The projects the co-op chose to put in its Rural Development application came from its $11.4 million construction work plan for 2017-2020. “We do a plan every four or five years to identify infrastructure needs like replacing lines or poles or expanding the system where the population is growing,” explained Phil Kinser, Southwest Iowa REC chief executive officer.

A member of Central Iowa Power Cooperative, You are leaving WAPA.gov. Southwest’s local economy relies heavily on agriculture. Like other recipients, the co-op’s service territory has steadily lost population over the last decade due to younger residents leaving for metropolitan areas.

Funding available
Applying for a Rural Development Loan is now more streamlined since the USDA moved much of the application process online. “Providing additional information or answers to follow-up questions is much quicker and easier,” Kinser observed.

But a good working relationship with the local USDA field office still makes for a less-stressful application process. Kinser offered kudos to Pat Bormann, General Field Representative with the Rural Utilities Service – Electric Programs. “Pat did a great job of helping us to navigate the application process,” Kinser recalled. “His assistance was invaluable.”

Applications for the Rural Energy for America Program Renewable Energy Systems & Energy Efficiency Improvement Loans & Grants are due April 30. Contact your local field office for more information.

WAPA congratulates Minnesota Valley Cooperative Light & Power Association, Southeast Colorado Power Association and Southwest Iowa Rural Electric Cooperative for taking the initiative to improve their systems and their communities.

Ideas wanted: Submit your proposal for RMUE presentations

Deadline: March 16

The Advisory Committee is now accepting session proposals You are leaving WAPA.gov. for the 12th Rocky Mountain Utility Exchange. Presentations that address this year’s theme, “United We Understand,” as it relates to utility end-users will receive preference. The theme leverages concepts from the recent Shelton Group EcoPulse Report.You are leaving WAPA.gov.

This is your opportunity to share your experiences collaborating with other utilities and other departments within your own utility to achieve greater impacts in residential, commercial and industrial end-use applications through a customer-oriented approach.
The event will explore case study best practices and lessons learned about customer-facing programs related to energy (gas and water) efficiency, strategy, issues and integration with renewable energy, demand response and more.

Special consideration will be given to presentations that highlight:

  • Consumer engagement and unifying messages
  • Gas, electric and/or water utility programs cooperating across departments or service territories to improve the customer experience
  • New energy-efficiency and demand management technology, storage and electric vehicles
  • Energy-efficiency and renewables programs collaborating with local and regional efforts on carbon action or greenhouse gas goals
  • Strategic on-site energy and distribution system management

The conference provides general and breakout session interaction as well as networking opportunities. Proposed presentation formats may include:

  • General or breakout sessions up to 20 minutes long with Q&A
  • Snapshot panel talks of up to five minutes
  • Poster discussions during the Wednesday evening reception
  • Friday morning workshops or round table discussions two to four hours in length

The Rocky Mountain Utility Exchange is an intimate forum for networking and professional development that takes place at Aspen Meadows Resort in Aspen, Colorado. Around 150 utility and government organization staff and trade allies attend, giving everyone the chance to learn about utility customer programs and services, and products to support them. This year’s event is scheduled for Sept. 19-21.

For professionals who have not previously attended the RMUE, a limited number of scholarships are available. See the FAQ sheet for details and to download an application.

ACEEE releases third, final video in ‘Health and Environment’ series

Energy Retrofits Clear the Air in Pittsburgh, You are leaving WAPA.gov. the final installment in a three-part video series from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), is now available to watch online.

The videos share the stories of homeowners in three eastern states, and the effect energy-efficiency upgrades have had on their lives. The theme running through the series is that reducing energy waste lessens the need to burn fossil fuels to generate electricity. Those cuts deliver big gains in health, because pollutants from burning fossil fuels contribute to four of the leading causes of death in the United States: cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, heart disease and stroke.

The series is part of ACEEE’s new Health and Environment program, launched last year to research the linkages among health, environment and energy efficiency, and to educate policymakers. Later this year, ACEEE will release a series of reports that will further explore the health and environmental benefits of saving energy.

A two-day Conference on Health, Environment & Energy ACEEE is planning for December will showcase the research and promote others’ work in this growing field. Utilities are welcomed to attend the conference in New Orleans to add their voices to this critical conversation.

Source: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, 2/6/18

Fargo wins energy prize, Fort Collins takes second place

After nearly three years of competition, the Georgetown University Energy Prize You are leaving WAPA.gov. (GUEP) announced the winners, and the top honors go to cities served by WAPA customers. Fargo, North DakotaYou are leaving WAPA.gov. took first place, receiving a prize package that includes support toward $5 million in financing for an energy efficiency dream project. Fort Collins, You are leaving WAPA.gov. the only Colorado city to advance to the final round, came in second.

Over the course of the competition, Fargo reduced its overall energy consumption by more than 172 billion Btu, to rank fourth among the 50 semifinalists’ overall energy scores. In the final round, the judges evaluated the 10 top- performing cities and counties on their energy-saving approach, performance and prospects for nationwide replicability and scalability.

Accepting the prize on Dec. 18, from left: eFargo Fellow Dylan Neururer; Fargo Mayor Tim Mahoney; NDSU assistant professor of architecture Malini Srivastava; Cass County Electric Cooperative CEO Marshal Albright; Technical Lead Peter Atwood and Uwe Brandes, executive director of the Georgetown University Energy Prize. (Photo by Kim Hyatt / Forum News Service)

Lose-A-Watt,” You are leaving WAPA.gov. as Fort Collins dubbed its two-year energy reduction campaign, saved the community more than 160 billion BTUs of energy and reduced carbon emissions by 34,436 metric tons. The contest targeted electricity and natural gas use by residential and municipal and K-12 sectors.

Multi-faceted competition
The beauty of GUEP is that it gave America’s small- to medium-sized towns, cities and counties a way to rethink how they use energy. To reduce their energy consumption, the communities:

  • Implemented bold new local policies on energy-transparency, energy-savings and clean energy technology.
  • Conducted deep data mining of their energy use and community infrastructure.
  • Focused on increasing energy efficiency in neighborhoods with high energy use in all income brackets.
  • Created novel financing mechanisms to enable their residents to invest in new energy upgrades.
  • Used radically unique approaches to change behavior and help communities rethink their energy-use habits, including gamification and the latest methods in social science research.

Starting in April 2014, communities across the country applied to participate and filed detailed long-term plans once accepted into the competition. From January 2015 to December 2016, semifinalists competed to reduce their utility-supplied energy consumption in a way that might yield continuing improvements in their own communities and could be replicated by others.

Judges selected the finalist communities in 2017, based on energy saved during the two-year period. The winner was selected by combining those results with scores in weighted categories, including innovation, potential for replication, likely future performance, equitable access, community and stakeholder engagement, education and overall quality and success.

Teamwork creates success
Fargo’s program was built on a partnership between the city, North Dakota State University You are leaving WAPA.gov. (NDSU) and the utilities Xcel Energy and Cass County Electric Cooperative You are leaving WAPA.gov. (CCEC). Putting together a team where each party brings a particular expertise to the table was critical to Fargo’s success, said Malini Srivastava, an assistant architecture professor at NDSU. “The university researched and designed the projects to lower energy use, the utilities supplied data for benchmarking and the city provided the communication network to engage the citizens,” she explained.

CCEC had recently installed an automated metering infrastructure that collects data in up to 15-minute intervals. Having a clear picture of electricity use by homes, apartments, schools, park districts and municipal buildings proved to be very beneficial in moving the project forward. “The meter data definitely increased the likelihood of Fargo winning the Georgetown University Energy Prize,” said CCEC President and CEO Marshal Albright.

Engaging online, in person
Srivastava, the project lead for NDSU, created another important piece of the city’s strategy, eFargo. The web portal engaged the community with games and a narrative. “Gaming made saving energy fun and easy to understand,” said Fargo Planning Director Nicole Crutchfield. “eFargo was a great way to educate students and the general public about energy efficiency.”

The website attracted more than 300 participants to play the open game during eight weeks. The school game was even more successful, with more than 1,500—mostly students—participating over a six-week period. “We challenged local schools to defeat the Waste-a-Watt character by using their knowledge about energy and creativity,” Albright said. “The schools competed to reduce energy consumption over six weeks. Fargo’s Roosevelt Elementary won the challenge, reducing the school’s energy consumption by 29 percent.”

Getting school children involved was the most effective outreach, Crutchfield noted, but engaging citizens at libraries, public events, churches and other faith-based groups also paid off. Local experts in energy production and distribution joined the advocacy effort, forming the Citizens’ Local Energy Action Network—CLEAN—to advocate for renewable energy and evolving technologies in transportation.

Upping their building game
Another project that helped secure the top honor was designing affordable “passive houses” Fargo hopes to develop in partnership with a builder. NDSU architecture students researched and designed four high-performance homes. “The students did professional-level work, and I think it was educational for them to watch the city work through the permitting process,” Crutchfield said.

Other initiatives included providing financial assistance to low-income homeowners for weatherization and to preserve existing housing stock in the city’s older neighborhoods. Fargo also adopted and is actively enforcing the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code. The city hopes to keep working with NDSU on coming up with creative ways to reinforce our housing stock. “That is one possible use for the prize,” Crutchfield said.

Words matter
The city of Fort Collins, a long-time leader in municipal sustainability, used the GUEP competition as an opportunity to hone some existing programs and strategies and to test new ones. Fort Collins Utilities (FCU) and the city’s Environmental Services led a campaign built on climate action goals that are already reducing the community’s environmental impact.

One particular area of success, according to Fort Collins Sr. Environmental Planner Katy McLaren, was in tightening up and lightening up the language in outreach material. “We built our messaging around specific actions and limited seasonal campaigns to three actions,” McLaren said.

Social science-based marketing approaches informed the Lose-a-Watt campaign but the website avoided utility jargon to engage visitors with lighter, more fun language. Those lessons will be incorporated into the city’s future marketing and outreach campaigns, noted McLaren. “I think other utilities could benefit from looking at how we framed the efficiency actions, as well as the use of lighter language in messaging,” she added.

Many ways to save
The Lose-a-Watt website provided Fort Collins residents with a variety of options for taking action to reduce their energy use, some established and some launched for the competition. Homeowners could make home performance upgrades with Efficiency Works Neighborhood, a pilot program that streamlined the utility’s rebate process for efficiency improvements. “FCU moved it to full program status and will continue to refine it going forward,” McLaren said.

Volunteers for the Lose-a-Watt Porchlight Campaign went door to door, offering to replace incandescent bulbs in porch lights with a free LED bulb.

Volunteers for the Lose-a-Watt Porchlight Campaign went door to door, offering to replace incandescent bulbs in porch lights with a free LED bulb. (Photo by city of Fort Collins)

Residents who were inspired to volunteer could join the Porchlight Campaign. Volunteers visit neighborhoods around the city to see what type of light bulbs homes have in their porch light fixture. If a home’s porch light has an incandescent bulb, volunteers offer to replace it with a free LED bulb.

The Workwise ChallengeYou are leaving WAPA.gov. got the business community involved in the competition by giving businesses free home conservation kits to hand out to their employees. The business with the most employees installing kits received prizes and recognition. Utility representatives used the challenge as an opening to introduce commercial customers to ClimateWise, the city’s free, voluntary program to help Fort Collins businesses reduce their environmental impact.

Some things work, some don’t
As with Fargo, Fort Collins found engaging students to be the “biggest bang for the buck.” Poudre School District worked with the city to present the Voltbusters education program for K-3 grades. “The kids take the information home to share with their parents, and the parents are much more interested because their kids are into it,” McLaren echoed Crutchfield’s observation.

The Voltbuster Challenge enlisted Poudre Valley students to save energy. Both GUEP winners said that getting children involved in a program is an effective way to reach parents.

The Voltbuster Challenge enlisted Poudre Valley students to save energy. Both GUEP winners said that getting children involved in a program is an effective way to reach parents. (Photo by city of Fort Collins)

Gaming—specifically a gaming app created by Joulebug You are leaving WAPA.gov.—was less of a success for Fort Collins. “It would probably have been more effective if we ran it for one year, instead of two,” McLaren said.

Overall, maintaining the community’s level of engagement for the duration of the competition proved challenging, McLaren acknowledged. The fact that Georgetown University struggled to keep its dashboard updated with progress reports did not help, she said.

Worth effort
Both cities saw the competition as a positive experience that gave them permission to experiment with new ideas and pushed them to communicate more with residents about energy use.

Srivastava agreed with Albright about the importance of having detailed energy-use data to measure programs. She is currently preparing a report on the competition to present at a conference in the spring, and is looking forward to sharing Fargo’s lessons with other cities. Perhaps the greatest lesson the Georgetown University Energy Prize winners learned, said Srivastava, is that, “Small cities shouldn’t be afraid of trying new ideas.”

WAPA congratulates Fargo and Fort Collins on their creativity and initiative, and we look forward to seeing how they build on their success.

Schedule announced for 2018 DOE Tribal Webinar Series

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and WAPA are once again co-sponsoring the Tribal Energy Webinar Series. The 2018 series of 11 webinars focuses on Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination through Community Energy Development. The free webinars are held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mountain Time the last Wednesday of each month, beginning in January and concluding in November.

Roughly two million American Indians and Alaska Natives from 567 federally recognized tribes live on or near 56.2 million acres of Indian land. These lands are also rich in energy resources that offer the tribes the opportunity for economic development and greater self-determination. The 2018 webinar series provides these diverse communities with the information and knowledge required to evaluate and prioritize their energy options.

Topics will cover establishing tribal consensus on energy goals and objectives; instituting short and long-range actions; and making informed technical, financial, market, policy, and regulatory decisions. Speakers will present tribal case studies highlighting proven energy development best practices. Attendees will discover tools and resources to facilitate and accelerate community energy and infrastructure development in Indian Country.

STEM interns, here at the Acoma Pueblo, assist with Office of Indian Energy-funded projects. Former interns will talk about their experiences with the program at the Jan. 31 Tribal Energy Webinar.

STEM interns, here at the Acoma Pueblo, assist with Office of Indian Energy-funded projects. Former interns will talk about their experiences with the program at the Jan. 31 Tribal Energy Webinar. (Photo by DOE Office of Indian Energy)

Action-oriented program
The series begins on Jan. 31 with Office of Indian Energy: Advancing Future Leaders through STEM. You are leaving WAPA.gov. This webinar will highlight the college student internship program for Native students interested in energy project planning and development activities. Former interns will talk about their experience with experts in the field and at DOE’s national laboratories, and how the program helped them make a positive impact in Indian Country. Applications are now being accepted through February 19 for the summer 2018 internship opportunity.

The rest of the schedule builds on past series with an emphasis on process, action and community-wide engagement:

There is no charge to attend, but registration is required. Attendees must have Internet access, computer compatibility with GoToMeeting software, and a phone line.

Source: DOE Office of Indian Energy via Green Power News, 1/19/18

UEF opens with round table for utility, government professionals

April 25-27
Doubletree Hotel
Rohnert Park, CA

The 38th annual Utility Energy Forum You are leaving WAPA.gov. (UEF) will begin as it has for the past several years with a Pre-Forum Workshop just for the people who keep the lights on—staff from utilities and government agencies.

This year's Utility Energy Forum will take place at the Doubletree Hotel in Rohnert Park, California, near the Sonoma Wine Country.

This year’s Utility Energy Forum will take place at the Doubletree Hotel in Rohnert Park, California, near the Sonoma Wine Country. (Photo by Doubletree Hotels)

The session gives power providers and government representatives their own time to candidly discuss issues that concern them, strictly from their own point of view. “The UEF attracts a lot of trade allies and representatives from related field, but it is first and foremost for utilities,” explained WAPA Energy Services Manager Ron Horstman. “Giving utilities a chance to ‘talk amongst themselves’ first sets the tone for the meeting. They go into the forum with a clear idea of their shared challenges and what they hope to learn.”

Join us!
The UEF is a California-centric event, but don’t let that stop you from attending. You may have more common ground with West Coast utilities than you realize.

It is a great opportunity to network with energy services colleagues and learn about their customer programs related to energy efficiency, renewable energy, key account management and other customer services. This year’s theme, Preparing for the New Energy Future, asks us to challenge our traditional thinking to be ready for the rapidly changing energy utility industry.

The Double Tree Hotel in Rohnert Park, California, will host the UEF this year. The registration rate includes not only your conference registration, but your lodging and all your meals. The views of the Sonoma Wine Country are free.

Horstman will be attending the UEF and moderating the Pre-Forum Workshop along with Paul Reid of Azusa Light and PowerYou are leaving WAPA.gov. so attendees will get to share their thoughts and concerns about WAPA as well. Your Energy Services Bulletin editor (me) will also be on hand to hear your stories and pick your brain about services you would like us to offer. We look forward to meeting WAPA customers and learning all about your challenges—and your innovative solutions—April 25-27.

SMUD recognized for innovation at gathering of state utility regulators

WAPA congratulates customer Sacramento Municipal Utility District You are leaving WAPA.gov. (SMUD) on receiving an innovation award at the annual meeting of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners You are leaving WAPA.gov. (NARUC) in November.

The award for Municipal-level Innovation in Regulatory Policy recognized SMUD’s work testing a new cooling technology that significantly reduces summer peak loads. SMUD’s project was one of 10 innovation awards NARUC presented at the meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

Widely recognized need
For summer-peaking utilities, the air conditioning load is the 600-lb. gorilla. According to a 2006 California Energy Commission report, on the hottest summer days, air conditioning alone accounts for more than 30 percent of the peak demand on the statewide electric network. Conventional rooftop-packaged cooling units—80 percent of building systems—exacerbate the heavy demand that summer air conditioning puts on the grid.

In a hot, dry climate (like much of WAPA’s territory), indirect evaporative cooling (IDEC) technology has shown strong potential for reducing peak demand. It works on the same principle as direct evaporative cooling lowering air temperature by causing water to evaporate. The main difference with an indirect system is that a heat exchanger is used to cool the air supplied to the living space. The fact that the technology also uses less water than the direct method makes it even more attractive in the drought-wracked West.

IDEC cooling was an excellent candidate for SMUD’s Customer Advanced Technologies (CAT) Program, You are leaving WAPA.gov. designed to help customers use and evaluate new or underutilized technologies. The CAT program pays some of the costs for installing the demonstration equipment.

Tale of two businesses
SMUD enlisted two large customers, both with cooling issues, to participate in a demonstration spanning the summers of 2014 to 2015. Tri-Tool, a custom tool manufacturer, replaced its conventional cooling system in the shop with a Climate Wizard You are leaving WAPA.gov. IDEC system. Environment Synectics, which provides environmental services for the government, installed a hybrid system combining Climate Wizard units with conventional systems.

TriTool employees get a look at the new indirect evaporative cooling system SMUD tested on their facility. The Climate Wizard also improved air quality on the shop floor.

TriTool employees get a look at the new indirect evaporative cooling system SMUD tested on their facility. The Climate Wizard also improved air quality on the shop floor. (Photo by Sacramento Municipal Utility District)

The CAT program paid for the incremental cost of the Climate Wizard over standard air conditioning technology. The units are manufactured in Australia, so between shipping costs and smaller-scale production, the initial cost of the equipment can be a barrier to adoption. But SMUD Program Manager Jim Parks observed, “If your region has enough hot days, you will get your money’s worth.”

SMUD monitored the companies’ summer energy use after the significant retrofits to determine savings compared to the Title 24 You are leaving WAPA.gov. (California’s energy efficiency standards) baseline. The results from a summer of data collection indicated that both companies had reduced their energy use for cooling by around 50 percent compared to code requirements. “That falls right in the mid-range of Climate Wizard estimates of 40- to 65-percent savings,” said Parks.

The pilot system installed at Environmental Synectics combined Climate Wizard Units with conventional cooling equipment to reduce energy use during the summer cooling season.

The pilot system installed at Environmental Synectics combined Climate Wizard Units with conventional cooling equipment to reduce energy use during the summer cooling season. (Photo by Sacramento Municipal Utility District)

The benefits of IDEC for Tri-Tool went beyond lower electricity bills. The Climate Wizard not only made the facility more comfortable, but it purged contaminated air from the shop floor. The dry air supplied by IDEC also reduced the humidity in the shop, a problem caused by the use of water in the manufacturing process.

Recognition rolls in
The NARUC award is not the first one SMUD has received for the IDEC project. APPA honored the project with its 2017 Energy Innovator Award You are leaving WAPA.gov. and then nominated it for the NARUC award. “I didn’t know we were in the running until NARUC called to tell me that we won,” recalled Parks.

He added that SMUD enjoys getting the recognition. But it would be even better if the awards called attention to a product that, in the right climate, can reduce a large commercial customer’s energy use by double-digit percentages. The Climate Wizard could also help summer-peaking utilities effectively reduce their air conditioning loads. And that is better than any award.

Source: Public Power Daily, 11/15/17