SMUD recognized for innovation at gathering of state utility regulators

WAPA congratulates customer Sacramento Municipal Utility District You are leaving WAPA.gov. (SMUD) on receiving an innovation award at the annual meeting of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners You are leaving WAPA.gov. (NARUC) in November.

The award for Municipal-level Innovation in Regulatory Policy recognized SMUD’s work testing a new cooling technology that significantly reduces summer peak loads. SMUD’s project was one of 10 innovation awards NARUC presented at the meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

Widely recognized need
For summer-peaking utilities, the air conditioning load is the 600-lb. gorilla. According to a 2006 California Energy Commission report, on the hottest summer days, air conditioning alone accounts for more than 30 percent of the peak demand on the statewide electric network. Conventional rooftop-packaged cooling units—80 percent of building systems—exacerbate the heavy demand that summer air conditioning puts on the grid.

In a hot, dry climate (like much of WAPA’s territory), indirect evaporative cooling (IDEC) technology has shown strong potential for reducing peak demand. It works on the same principle as direct evaporative cooling lowering air temperature by causing water to evaporate. The main difference with an indirect system is that a heat exchanger is used to cool the air supplied to the living space. The fact that the technology also uses less water than the direct method makes it even more attractive in the drought-wracked West.

IDEC cooling was an excellent candidate for SMUD’s Customer Advanced Technologies (CAT) Program, You are leaving WAPA.gov. designed to help customers use and evaluate new or underutilized technologies. The CAT program pays some of the costs for installing the demonstration equipment.

Tale of two businesses
SMUD enlisted two large customers, both with cooling issues, to participate in a demonstration spanning the summers of 2014 to 2015. Tri-Tool, a custom tool manufacturer, replaced its conventional cooling system in the shop with a Climate Wizard You are leaving WAPA.gov. IDEC system. Environment Synectics, which provides environmental services for the government, installed a hybrid system combining Climate Wizard units with conventional systems.

TriTool employees get a look at the new indirect evaporative cooling system SMUD tested on their facility. The Climate Wizard also improved air quality on the shop floor.

TriTool employees get a look at the new indirect evaporative cooling system SMUD tested on their facility. The Climate Wizard also improved air quality on the shop floor. (Photo by Sacramento Municipal Utility District)

The CAT program paid for the incremental cost of the Climate Wizard over standard air conditioning technology. The units are manufactured in Australia, so between shipping costs and smaller-scale production, the initial cost of the equipment can be a barrier to adoption. But SMUD Program Manager Jim Parks observed, “If your region has enough hot days, you will get your money’s worth.”

SMUD monitored the companies’ summer energy use after the significant retrofits to determine savings compared to the Title 24 You are leaving WAPA.gov. (California’s energy efficiency standards) baseline. The results from a summer of data collection indicated that both companies had reduced their energy use for cooling by around 50 percent compared to code requirements. “That falls right in the mid-range of Climate Wizard estimates of 40- to 65-percent savings,” said Parks.

The pilot system installed at Environmental Synectics combined Climate Wizard Units with conventional cooling equipment to reduce energy use during the summer cooling season.

The pilot system installed at Environmental Synectics combined Climate Wizard Units with conventional cooling equipment to reduce energy use during the summer cooling season. (Photo by Sacramento Municipal Utility District)

The benefits of IDEC for Tri-Tool went beyond lower electricity bills. The Climate Wizard not only made the facility more comfortable, but it purged contaminated air from the shop floor. The dry air supplied by IDEC also reduced the humidity in the shop, a problem caused by the use of water in the manufacturing process.

Recognition rolls in
The NARUC award is not the first one SMUD has received for the IDEC project. APPA honored the project with its 2017 Energy Innovator Award You are leaving WAPA.gov. and then nominated it for the NARUC award. “I didn’t know we were in the running until NARUC called to tell me that we won,” recalled Parks.

He added that SMUD enjoys getting the recognition. But it would be even better if the awards called attention to a product that, in the right climate, can reduce a large commercial customer’s energy use by double-digit percentages. The Climate Wizard could also help summer-peaking utilities effectively reduce their air conditioning loads. And that is better than any award.

Source: Public Power Daily, 11/15/17

Solar stock tank group purchase ‘a huge success’

Utility program managers know that equipment rebates are not only a building block of load management strategies, but are also an effective customer outreach tool. Surprisingly effective, in the case of Holy Cross Energy’s You are leaving WAPA.gov. recent Passive Solar Livestock Tank Sales Event.

The passive solar stock tank Holy Cross Energy members Kevin White and Rachel Marble got for their horses was the start of a promotional sale that succeeded beyond the utility's expectations.

Holy Cross Energy Program Administrator Mary Wiener learned about the SunTank passive solar stock tank from members Kevin White and Rachel Marble, who got one for their horses. (Photo by Joey Calabrese, Holy Cross Energy Communications Specialist)

The Colorado electrical cooperative teamed up with Clean Energy Economy for the Region You are leaving WAPA.gov. (CLEER) and Pine Ranch Products You are leaving WAPA.gov. in October to offer the SunTank stock watering tank at wholesale pricing to livestock owners in three Rocky Mountain counties. Members responded enthusiastically to the offer, placing 30 orders for a total of 58 tanks. “It caught us a little off guard,” admitted Mary Wiener, Energy Efficiency Program administrator for Holy Cross Energy.

Manufactured by the Utah-based company, the tank eliminates the need either for costly electric heating units or for manually breaking and shoveling ice that forms on tanks in subzero weather. The water in the heavily insulated tank is not exposed directly to sunlight so it is algae resistant and requires less cleaning than a conventional stock tank. As far as Wiener can tell, it is the only product of its type on the market.

Product opens doors
Holy Cross has offered a $250 rebate on solar stock tanks for several years as part of its WE CARE carbon reduction program, but there have been few takers. “We don’t have a big agricultural load,” Wiener explained. “It’s mainly a few irrigation pumps.”

At $649 to $825, the retail price for the 25- and 42-gallon SunTanks might be a barrier as well. However, Wiener thinks that the lack of interest in the rebate mainly stemmed from members not being aware of the offer. “I didn’t know about solar stock tanks until a member told me about them,” she said.

Wiener learned about the water tanks during a home energy audit she performed for members Rachel Marble and Kevin White, who are horse owners. The couple was understandably excited to show off their new solar-heated SunTank to their power provider’s efficiency expert. Wiener, for her part, immediately recognized an opportunity to connect with members she rarely saw outside of the occasional request for an energy audit.

CLEER, a public benefit organization which frequently partners with Holy Cross on member efficiency programs, had expressed interest in doing an outreach project for agricultural members. While the stock tank is not likely to have a big impact on Holy Cross’s load, “It was something that would really help our members,” Wiener said. “Utilities should be looking for services they can offer besides just electricity.”

Word gets out, orders come in
Getting members’ attention is just as critical to a program’s success as identifying valuable products and services. Holy Cross started the promotion with a booth at the local Potato Day Festival, which attracted a lot of members with a drawing for one of the stock tanks. Two articles in local newspapers followed the festival and the October sale was posted on the utility website event calendar.

If Pine Ranch received orders for more than 10 tanks, buyers would get the wholesale price. The company eliminated the shipping fee by agreeing to drive the tanks from the Santa Clara, Utah, factory. To sweeten the deal, Holy Cross increased the rebate from $250 to $300 and covered the 2.9 percent sales tax in the rebate. How could livestock owners resist?

Booboo and his owner Rodney, a Holy Cross Lineman Foreman, wait for the installation of their new SunTank.

Booboo and his owner Rodney, a Holy Cross lineman foreman, wait for the installation of their new SunTank. (Photo by Joey Calabrese, Holy Cross Energy Communications Specialist)

In fact, not many did. Colorado Mountain College You are leaving WAPA.gov. alone ordered 10 tanks for the veterinary technology program on its Spring Valley campus. The SunTanks support the school’s sustainability efforts while providing the program’s animals with a cleaner, more accessible water source. The sale was so successful, Pine Ranch was swamped by the number of orders and had to move the late November delivery date to mid-December. “I didn’t realize we had so many livestock animals in our territory,” observed Wiener.

Success has its price
Although the partners are pleased that the promotion succeeded far beyond their expectations, Holy Cross has no plans to repeat the Passive Solar Stock Tank Sale soon. “I would do some things differently if we did it again,” Wiener acknowledged. “It was a lot of work for a very small member segment.”

Some changes she would make to the program include taking preorders and holding the sale in September to make sure that the tanks arrive by November, ahead of the freezing weather. Wiener also advises choosing your partners carefully, as some organizations that initially wanted to join the promotion failed to follow through with the promised support. Pine Ranch, however, did a great job, she added. “The company was really well organized, which helped them handle the big order.”

Ultimately, Holy Cross Energy counts the Passive Solar Stock Tank Sale as a win, and Wiener believes other cooperatives with livestock customers should consider doing a group purchase event. “Try something new,” she urged. “It was good for our customers and our relationship with them, and it brought attention to a great product made by a small business.”

Source: Clean Energy Economy News, 12/4/17

Eco Pulse 2017 ends year on message of unity

Artwork by Shelton Group

In a country that increasingly seems to be defined by its division, it can be hard to market products and services that everybody needs, a challenge not lost on electric utilities. Happily, there are still some things people agree on—energy efficiency comes to mind—and the latest Eco Pulse report explores how to use those areas of agreement to tell your product’s story.

Agreeing on Earth
United We Understand You are leaving WAPA.gov. takes a deep dive to look at the values that drive the attitudes and behaviors people have with regard to sustainability. The data collected in the report suggest that the values structure in our country has more common roots than news headlines would indicate.

A survey of 2,000 respondents showed that Americans believe three things:

  1. We all deserve a clean planet.
  2. There’s a big problem happening with our environment.
  3. Everyone bears responsibility for fixing environmental problems.

Also, the number of respondents who say sustainability is an important part of their consumer choices has increased since 2013 and they believe that companies should do their part. However, a majority of respondents believe companies won’t take action unless a law requires them to.

Words matter
The report shares words that can unify Americans and thereby help brands connect with consumers. Using words that unite can help businesses use sustainability to build their brands across a broader audience. For utilities, the carefully chosen marketing language can create support for sustainability initiatives and program offerings, ensure a message that resonates and increase customer loyalty.

Language that divides rather than unites is also covered in the report. Words that trigger neutral or negative responses tend to have a less clear meaning across different demographics and do not resonate with our broader beliefs about how the world works.

Speak to values
Researchers concluded that Americans value the environment more than we might expect, but their reasons for doing so differ. Using a set of agreement statements developed in the seminal book, Environmental Values in American Culture, the Eco Pulse report found motivations that can be categorized into three distinct groups: earth-centric, human-centric and economic-centric. By understanding these values, and how to articulate them, you can better leverage your sustainability story, build your customer relationships and drive program participation.

You can download United We Understand for free from the Shelton Group, but registration is required. Start off 2018 with a revitalized marketing strategy for your customer programs and don’t forget to tell Energy Services how it goes. Happy New Year!

Source: The Shelton Group, 12/7/17

GCEA program introduces members to clean transportation

Electric vehicle (EV) technology has come such a long way in a short time that Gunnison County Electric Association (GCEA) has included member education in its marketing plan to promote this promising new load.

GCEA added the Chevy Spark-e to its fleet of company cars in 2016. According to a study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, one reason people don't buy electric vehicles is that they have never had the chance to drive or ride in one.

GCEA added the Chevy Spark-e to its fleet of company cars in 2016. According to a study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, one reason people don’t buy electric vehicles is that they have never had the chance to drive or ride in one. (Photo by Gunnison County Electric Association)

GCEA offers members a rebate on EV chargers and a time-of-use (TOU) rate to encourage EV owners to shift their charging to off-peak times. The program has been in place for almost two years and now supports an estimated 40 vehicles—about a dozen all-electric—in the cooperative’s service territory. That is an impressive uptake rate for the new technology, especially in a largely rural area with harsh winters. It points to the importance of laying the groundwork with customers to help them embrace innovation.

Fueling up
Expanding the supporting infrastructure for EVs was the first step GCEA took to launch an EV program. A January 2016 report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) exploring barriers to EV adoption found that awareness of charging stations was the biggest factor in public acceptance. “We were already gearing up the program when the NREL report came to our attention,” recalled GCEA CEO Mike McBride. “It mostly just confirmed what we already suspected.”

Working with the nearby ski resort town of Crested Butte, Colorado, GCEA energized the first public EV charging station in Gunnison County in late 2015. A grant from the Colorado Energy Office assisted with the purchase and installation. Crested Butte dedicated two parking spots in the middle of town to the charger, a generous gesture considering the shortage of parking in the ski town. “We were understandably nervous about letting a parking space go unused,” McBride observed. “Fortunately, a member who likes to ski there bought a Chevy Volt in December 2015, which certainly helped with utilization early on.”

GCEA's Chevy Spark-e refuels at the charging station the co-op installed in Lake City , Colorado. The model has a range of up to 80 miles from a full charge.

GCEA’s Chevy Spark-e refuels at the charging station the co-op installed in Lake City , Colorado. The model has a range of up to 80 miles from a full charge. (Photo by Gunnison County Electric Association)

Another grant from the Charge Ahead Colorado program supported the installation of another public electric vehicle charging station in Lake City in October of 2016. The station is the same model as the Crested Butte charger, so EV owners enjoy ease of use and familiarity with the equipment.

Meet the EVs
The NREL study also asked if respondents had been in an EV, and most answered that they had not. That hands-on experience is central to convincing people that an EV is a viable choice for personal transportation, noted McBride. “Few people have actually driven, or even ridden in a plug-in electric vehicle,” he added.

By the spring of 2016, two GCEA staff members had their own plug-in EVs and GCEA acquired a plug-in hybrid for its CEO’s use: GCEA got a Ford Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid, a lineman bought a Nissan Leaf and McBride got a Fiat 500 E. Co-op employees had the chance to drive the vehicles at a company meeting, and “People were surprised by the performance,” said McBride.

GCEA board members decided that it would be great for members to have the same opportunity to test drive an EV at the open house for the Crested Butte charging station. McBride began to look for a rental car but couldn’t find a company that carried EVs. “It seems they had trouble renting them out, so they just phased EVs out of their fleets,” he said.

Not to be deterred, board members authorized the purchase of an EV for the GCEA fleet. Saving gas costs, using the company product to fuel the car and showing members that their co-op walked the walk seemed like a win all the way around, so GCEA bought a Chevy Spark EV.

The company EV has made appearances at open houses, member meetings and even a car show in Gunnison, along with a couple of the employee-owned EVs. One particularly savvy market strategy has been to loan the car for a week to members who are community or thought leaders or who show some interest in the technology.

Making inroads
These efforts have resulted in a slow but steady change in GCEA members’ perception of electric vehicles. “People would say, ‘It’s great but it won’t work for me—I live 20 miles out of town.’ But that is well within range of a charged vehicle,” McBride said. “They worry about not being able to drive an EV in the winter, but now they are seeing EV owners driving their cars year-round.”

Challenges remain, including those specific to a Colorado mountain town. While familiarity tends to ease drivers’ “range anxiety” over time, “When the temperature drops below 32 degrees, the range does go down,” McBride acknowledged.

The relative lack of charging stations between GCEA’s stations and neighboring communities still presents a barrier, too. “If it is cold and snowing and the nearest charger is 65 miles away, that is a real problem for an EV owner,” said McBride. He added, however, “In many two-car households, there would be no inconvenience if one of the cars was electric with the other capable of longer trips.”

Raising awareness, gathering data
As EV ownership becomes more common among GCEA members, the marketing—and education— messages are shifting to focus on time of use.

Most consumers are only vaguely aware of concepts like on-peak rates and demand charges. “But we don’t want them to fuel their vehicles with the least-efficient resource or wind up paying more than necessary for cleaner transportation,” McBride explained.

By requiring members who apply for the charger rebate to sign up for TOU rates, GCEA is encouraging consumers to be more thoughtful about when and how they use energy. The charger rebate has also created a ready-made sample for a case study on TOU rates. “EVs are a great subject because they are a discrete load,” said McBride. “Members know when their vehicles are charging and can clearly understand how that affects their usage pattern.”

Therein lies the difference between a good customer program and a great one. A good program helps customers save money and energy and helps the utility control its load. A great program teaches customers about energy use and creates a dialogue between consumers and their power provider. By that measure, GCEA’s EV program is on track to achieve greatness.

 

ACEEE releases 2017 state energy-efficiency scorecard

WAPA salutes six states in our territory that ranked in the Top 20 most energy-efficient states, according to the annual ranking by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. You are leaving WAPA.gov.

The 2017 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard rated California as the second most efficient state in the nation behind Massachusetts. Minnesota came in at ninth place, Colorado scored a 15, Utah and Arizona tied for 17th place and Iowa rounded out the group as the 19th most efficient state.

ACEEE annually ranks the energy efficiency of each state in six categories. How did your state do?

ACEEE annually ranks the energy efficiency of each state in six categories. How did your state do? (Artwork by American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy)

The state of Nevada showed improvement, rising three positions from 2016 to rank 34th, partly as a result of state efforts like the Home Energy Retrofit Opportunities for Seniors You are leaving WAPA.gov. (HEROS) program overseen by the Governor’s Office of Energy. Michael Jones of Carson City used the program to properly seal his home, saving money and—just as important for a person with disabilities—improving his comfort.On average, participants like Jones reduce annual electricity use by 5,143 kilowatt-hours and natural gas consumption by 266 therms, saving $927 on their energy bills annually.

For the first time this year, the state-specific score sheets included stories of individuals and communities. The ACEEE found schools that improved lighting and taught students about sustainability, state facilities that secured more reliable electricity and senior citizens who improved the comfort of their homes. The stories demonstrate the effect smart energy-efficiency policies and programs have on our wallets, local economies, productivity and quality of life.

Now in its 11th edition, the ACEEE State Energy Efficiency Scorecard benchmarks state progress on efficiency policies and programs that save energy while benefiting the environment and promoting growth. The scorecard ranks states in six categories—utility programs, transportation, building energy codes, combined heat and power, state initiatives and appliance standards—using data vetted by state energy officials.

You can download the report for free (registration required) and check out your state’s scorecard, compare it with others and learn about programs that are driving efficiency gains.

Source: American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, 9/27/17

ED3 announces 2018 electric rate decrease of 2 percent

The price of necessities only goes in one direction—up—but don’t tell Electrical District No. 3 You are leaving WAPA.gov. (ED3). The Maricopa, Arizona, public utility is lowering its 2018 electric rates an average of 2 percent for residential, commercial, small industrial, large industrial and agriculture customers.

At a time when other utilities and businesses across the nation are raising their rates, the ED3 board of directors approved a rate decrease for the third year in a row. CEO and General Manager William Stacy attributes this exciting accomplishment to sound management and a diligent planning process.

Partnership cuts costs
Specifically, Stacy noted the benefits of being part of the Southwest Public Power Agency You are leaving WAPA.gov. (SPPA). In 2014, ED3 formed the joint action agency with 17 other Arizona public power and tribal utilities. Members enjoy economies of scale in terms of managing existing resources and developing new ones, Stacy explained. “We see a lot of benefits for our customers, particularly those in Arizona’s rural or tribal areas,” he added.

A new power pooling agreement with SPPA for electricity from the Hoover Dam has allowed ED3 to reduce costs for balancing services. This year ED3 was able to move its controlling area into the Arizona Electric Power Cooperative’s You are leaving WAPA.gov. controlling area for additional savings on operating costs.

Planning for growth
To keep rates down, you also have to keep an eye on the future, especially in a community that is growing as fast as ED3’s service territory. “We are constantly reanalyzing our 10-year load growth plan,” said Stacy.

ED3 is the largest electrical district in the state, currently serving about 25,000 residential, commercial and irrigation meter connections. The district operates 12 distribution-level substations, and is building a new one to accommodate the average of 65 new homes springing up in the area each month. “In terms of rates, being large helps because we are able to spread fixed costs over a wide customer base,” Stacy acknowledged.

Wise use still important
Even with standard residential rates that are 10 percent lower than investor-owned Arizona Public Service, ED3 does not take customer satisfaction for granted. Programs to help customers manage their own energy use are very much a part of the district’s business model.

ED3 offers customers a Home Performance with Energy Star® Home Energy Audit for the heavily discounted price of $49. Homeowners can choose from a list participating contractors posted online. Customers can also attend free quarterly conservation workshops ED3 presents, and find energy conservation tips in the district’s bimonthly newsletter.

Rate, payment flexibility
In addition to having the lowest rates in the area, ED3 residential customers also have the choice of two time-of-use (TOU) rate schedules. The peak time for TOU-A is 9 a.m.-9 p.m. and 12-7 p.m. for TOU-B. The applications provide energy-saving tips so that customers can maximize the benefits of the schedule. “They can choose whichever one works best for them,” said Stacy.

ED3 also implemented a pre-paid metering program last year. Customers pre-pay for their electricity and receive daily text or email notifications of the amount they use and the amount remaining on their account. Studies have shown that customers who use a pre-pay option tend to use less electricity. Whether it is the energy savings or the feeling of control it gives customers, the program has proved surprisingly popular, Stacy observed. “We have 1,470 customers participating in it,” he said.

Which brings up another truism: People are always looking for ways to pay less for necessities. Luckily for ED3 customers, their utility is always looking for ways to help them.

Source: Public Power Daily, 11/6/17

Federal energy efficiency programs save energy, create jobs

A recent op-ed in the New York Times You are leaving WAPA.gov. serves as a reminder that energy efficiency is not only one of the most powerful resources we have for meeting energy and environmental goals, it is also a rare source of bipartisan agreement.

Agreed: Energy efficiency works
Citing a poll You are leaving WAPA.gov. by the Conservative Energy Network shortly after the November 2016 election, the writer noted that the majority of voters saw policies supporting energy efficiency as important. This is true despite the fact that energy efficiency itself is largely invisible, with economic impacts diffused throughout the economy. Imagine how enthusiastic Americans would be if they realized that more than 2.2 million people spend some or all of their work hours on energy-efficient technologies and services. That is more than the 1.9 million who work to produce electricity (solar, wind, nuclear), coal, oil and gas.

In addition to providing jobs, energy efficiency protects them by helping industries stay economically viable. Federal agencies develop efficiency standards for household appliances and work with American manufacturers to improve productivity. They provide testing and expertise to develop local and state building-efficiency codes for homes and commercial buildings.

Innovative, federally run efficiency programs boast a decades-long record of economic and environmental success across the nation, dating back at least 30 years. Energy Star is a shining example of a public-private partnership that saves American consumers and businesses billions of dollars per year. About three-quarters of U.S. households recognize the Energy Star label as way to control their energy costs while reducing power plant pollution.

The big picture tells an even more important story. The economy has grown by almost 150 percent since 1980 with a corresponding increase in energy consumption of about 20 quadrillion British thermal units. Over that same period, energy efficiency delivered more than 50 quads worth of energy services, far outpacing all other energy sources combined.

Waste still hurting economy
In spite of such impressive gains, however, energy waste still costs American businesses and households billions of dollars every year. In commercial buildings alone, where annual electricity costs are roughly $190 billion, about a third of this energy goes to waste, according to the Department of Energy. The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy ranks You are leaving WAPA.gov. the United States eighth among the top 23 energy-consuming nations in efficiency.

Emerging technologies and population growth are putting demands on our electricity grids that utilities of a generation ago never imagined. Knowing what is at stake, power providers are investing $7.5 billion annually in cost-effective electricity and natural gas efficiency programs.

The electricity industry can continue to build on the success that began when President Ronald Reagan signed the first legislation authorizing federal efficiency standards. Incorporate tools and strategies from federal energy-efficiency programs into your load management programs. Let your customers know about federal resources that might help them use less electricity. When we harness the power of the cheapest kilowatt—the one that is never used—everyone wins.

Source: New York Times, 11/7/17

Tips to help customers step up their water efficiency programs

Water utilities can’t seem to catch a break: The need to improve aging infrastructure has pushed water rates up in many parts of the country, while increasingly unpredictable weather patterns make conserving water more important than ever. Agencies that own their own treatment plants also have to be conscious of the wear and tear on aging equipment, as well as the cost of power for processing operations.Vector illustration of water tap with the Earth globe inside water drop on blue background

Strong customer relationships can be instrumental in working through such challenging times. Unfortunately, frustrated customers—especially large key accounts—who haven’t seen their water bills go down after installing low-flow fixtures may be feeling less than cooperative. The October issue of FacilitiesNet magazine You are leaving WAPA.gov. suggests 10 measures that can help customers take water efficiency to the next level. Use these recommendations to open dialogue with your biggest water users, educate them on the challenges you face and build the bridges that will help you find solutions.

1. Equipment upgrades – New equipment is almost always more efficient than older models, especially when equipment is nearing the end of its useful life. Businesses with commercial kitchens or laundries can see significant water and energy savings by investing in new dish and clothes washers. Replacing water-cooled chillers with air-cooled units and adding water recirculating systems where the hot water source is more than 100 feet from the fixture are other measures worth considering.

2. Leak detection – According to New York City’s Department of Environmental Protection, even a small toilet leak can waste 30 gallons daily at a cost of forty cents every day, and the statistics only get more alarming from there. A one-gallon-per-minute leak equals 1,140 gallons per day, which can run up a huge water bill even where local water rates are low. Given that many small leaks can be fixed quickly and inexpensively, leak detection is worth the constant vigilance it requires. It also pays to educate building occupants to be aware of leaking fixtures and mysterious dripping and running sounds, which leads to the next tip.

3. Staff/occupant training – The maintenance crew cannot be everywhere, especially in large buildings and campuses. Facility managers need to recruit housekeeping and other staff to alert building operators to plumbing leaks so problems can be addressed quickly. Make sure all staff knows who to call when they see a leak. A simple sign in restrooms and break rooms, for example, can tell building occupants who to contact when they notice a dripping faucet or running toilet. One school district trained its janitorial staff and vice principals to report all water leaks by calling a specific number, and saved $700,000 in utility bills in the first year of the program.

4. Metering and sub-metering – As the old saying goes, you can’t control what you don’t measure. Water metering and sub-metering can help in tracking water consumption and leak detection in both new and existing buildings. Ideally, water sub-metering could provide valuable input on cooling tower, irrigation and hot water use.

The article suggests that water metering is most effective when incorporated into the building management system so that the data is reported with other facility data. Keep in mind that many irrigation systems use proprietary protocols so you may need a communications interface, which will add to the total metering cost.

At least one water metering company markets a smart meter using a wireless mesh open radio protocol and battery-operated water sub-meters that report their data to plugged-in transceivers. These low cost installations are practical for existing buildings as well as for new construction.

5. Water audits – Water audits will help facility managers determine what next steps to take and in what order. Keep in mind, however, that water audits are a new practice and don’t have a standard protocol like energy audits. For a good starting point, check out South Florida Water Management District’s Water Efficiency and Self-Conducted Water Audits at Commercial and Institutional Facilities: A Guide for Facility ManagersYou are leaving WAPA.gov.

6. Benchmarking sustainability goals – Use the water audit to help establish where water is being used in a facility and benchmark sustainability goals. Software platforms are available that automatically import utility bills and then measure and benchmark the facility’s performance against your goals.

7. Cooling tower maintenance – Cooling towers are generally part of the HVAC system in large buildings of more than 10,000 square feet. HVAC water use can account for more than a quarter of the total water use in institutional buildings, according San Jose Environmental Services Department data. Facility managers should prioritize keeping cooling towers clean and minimizing scale buildup.

8. Irrigation systems – A range of options is available for improving both new and existing irrigation systems. For new installations, drip irrigation uses significantly less water than traditional sprinkler systems. And don’t forget to use native and low-moisture plants when landscaping.Incorporating smart controls that respond to weather events and soil moisture sensors can make existing systems more efficient. The City of Eden Prairie, Minnesota, decided to convert several athletic fields in 2008 to an irrigation controller with soil moisture sensors. By 2010, water use was reduced by 8 million gallons, saving the city $29,000.

9. Rainwater capture – If you are willing to do the research with local water, environmental or development bureaus, harvesting rainwater for irrigation is an excellent alternative to using municipal water. Rainwater could also be used in new construction for some indoor uses like flushing toilets. In all cases, be sure to check your municipal codes regarding the reuse of rainwater.

10. Graywater/reclaimed water use – The California Uniform Plumbing Code You are leaving WAPA.gov. defines graywater as “untreated waste water which has not come into contact with toilet waste.” It can be used for irrigation or non-potable building uses such as flushing toilets and urinals, but graywater’s acceptance is regulated by state and local governments. Each has its own definition of what constitutes graywater and what, if anything, it can be used for. Where water recycling is permitted by local authorities, reclaimed water is being put to good use for landscape irrigation, toilets and urinals.

Source: Facilitiesnet via RCM News, October 2017

Check out presentations from 11th RMUEE

This year's RMUEE was one of the best-attended in the event's 11-year history. More than 150 utility program managers and trade allies from around the Rocky Mountain region came to Aspen to learn and brainstorm.

This year’s RMUEE was one of the best-attended in the event’s 11-year history. More than 150 utility program managers and trade allies from around the Rocky Mountain region came to Aspen to learn and brainstorm.(Photo by UtilityExchange.org)

If you did not make it to Aspen this year to network with more than 150 utility professionals and trade allies, you can still find out what everyone was talking about (some of it, anyway). Download the presentations You are leaving WAPA.gov. from the Rocky Mountain Utility Efficiency Exchange (RMUEE), Sept. 27-29, to get a taste of this year’s hot topics.

Energy Auditor Eileen Wysocki of Holy Cross Energy shares her experience with her colleagues during a presentation. "Share, not stare," is the guiding philosophy of the RMUEE.

Energy Auditor Eileen Wysocki of Holy Cross Energy shares her experience with her colleagues during a presentation. “Share, not stare,” is the guiding philosophy of the RMUEE. (Photo by UtilityExchange.org)

Evergreen issues like customer engagement, quality assurance and program evaluation appeared alongside newer issues like electric vehicles, energy storage and smart buildings. If a theme ran through the event it was that utilities must look forward and plan for what is coming next. The industry must grapple with changing demographics, technologies that are altering the customer-utility dynamic and maturing strategies and policies that make energy and cost savings goals harder to reach.

And did we mention, Aspen, Colorado, in September? (Photo by UtilityExchange.org)

If these issues ring a bell, browse the RMUEE presentations to learn more about how your colleagues are preparing for the future. Then you can save the date of Sept. 19-21, 2018, to join them in person at the 12th annual Rocky Mountain Utility Efficiency Exchange.

Sign up to receive notices of upcoming events, including the Call for Presenters for the 12th RMUEE in January 2018.

Upper Great Plains taps South Sioux City for Administrator’s Award

WAPA Administrator Mark Gabriel will present WAPA’s prestigious Administrator’s Award to South Sioux City, Nebraska, You are leaving WAPA.gov. Oct. 18 at the Delta Hotels in South Sioux City.  The presentation is part of 2017 National Bioenergy Day, You are leaving WAPA.gov. an event that will be attended by local, state and federal officials and high-ranking industry representatives. Gabriel will also deliver the keynote address, “The Importance of Renewable Energy Diversification,” at Bioenergy Day. The event will also include a tour of the new Green Star Energy You are leaving WAPA.gov. gasifier power plant.

Despite its small size—a population just over 13,000—South Sioux City has consistently delivered innovation along with affordable, reliable power year after year, warranting the honor the award confers on a WAPA customer. But these accomplishments feel almost secondary to the vision that made them happen. South Sioux City is well known among its peers and many other WAPA customers for being exceptionally forward thinking and tenacious at finding and leveraging win-win partnerships.

Leading in renewables
South Sioux City is pursuing clean, low-carbon electricity with a unique mix of projects.

A 2.3-megawatt (MW) photovoltaic array is only the latest example of the town’s efforts to reduce its carbon footprint. The 21-acre solar park began operation in January and generates the equivalent of 5 percent of the city’s total electricity needs. South Sioux City also recently selected a firm to build 15 MW of new wind power and signed an agreement to begin receiving generation from it in 2018. Both the wind and the solar projects are public-private partnerships.

South Sioux City’s Solar Park: 2.3-megawatt array (1,200 panels) located on a 21-acre solar park south of the city, alongside C Avenue. The array generates enough energy to provide 5 percent of South Sioux City’s electrical needs.

South Sioux City’s Solar Park: 2.3-megawatt array (1,200 panels) located on a 21-acre solar park south of the city, alongside C Avenue. The array generates enough energy to provide 5 percent of South Sioux City’s electrical needs. (Photo by Nebraskans for Solar)

In a region where agriculture and related businesses are the leading industries, biomass represents an energy resource that South Sioux City has captured through different projects. Three major food processing plants divert animal, grain and other wastes to an anaerobic digester that extracts methane from the stream and feeds it into the natural gas pipeline. The nearby Siouxland Ethanol Plant You are leaving WAPA.gov. displaces up to 9 percent of its natural gas needs for ethanol production with landfill gas from the LP Gill landfill.

The Scenic Park campground was the site of a pilot program in 2015, using a gasifier woody biomass system to generate 50 kilowatts of electricity from wood waste from storm damage. The unit was so successful that South Sioux City entered into an agreement with Green Star Energy to build a 3-MW gasifier. The new power plant will take city and industrial waste wood and dead and dying trees destined for the landfill and convert it into electricity.

Another potential project with Green Star Energy shows that South Sioux City has not lost sight of the tried-and-true renewable resources. The partners are seeking funding to build an innovative hydropower generator along the Missouri River that flows through the south end of the city. The run-of-river turbine design resembles a boat dock, would be safe for fish and aquatic animals and could produce enough electricity to save South Sioux City about $450 each day.

Conserve, reduce, manage
Energy innovation in South Sioux City is not limited to developing new resources. Planning and wise use are just as important to creating a cleaner, sustainable energy supply.

When peak demand needs to be curtailed, the city takes a two-pronged approach. First, a major industrial load voluntarily ramps down its demand by 11 percent to save not only its own energy costs but the energy costs for the city as a whole. On the residential side, the municipal utility has placed demand meters into service to control peak demand from air conditioner use. Both strategies have helped the community to contain electric costs.

South Sioux City has performed energy audits on all city buildings and facilities, and made improvements to systems such as lighting and heating and cooling, to save energy.

South Sioux City has performed energy audits on all city buildings and facilities, and made improvements to systems such as lighting and heating and cooling, to save energy. (Photo by Ammodramus)

The municipal utility has performed energy audits on all city buildings and facilities to identify energy-saving opportunities. Improvements included adding variable speed drives, converting street and signal lighting to LED and installing LED office lighting. Energy-efficient heating and cooling measures and practices have also been implemented in city buildings.

To address the need for backup support and electric demand relief during peak times, the city is designing a 5-MW, state-of-the-art natural gas-powered generating station. Excess generation from the unit will be offered to the Southwest Power Pool You are leaving WAPA.gov. markets.

Practicing stewardship
South Sioux City was the first city in Nebraska to implement a paperless city council. In addition to reducing environmental impacts, the approach simplifies the archiving of council activities and makes it easier for the public to access more information. A voice-activated council chamber video recording system allows citizens to access live and archived meetings.

Tree health and sustainability are important to South Sioux City, which has qualified for the Arbor Day Foundation’s You are leaving WAPA.gov. Tree City USA designation for 25 years and earned the Growth Award for 10 years. For the past eight years, the city has planted one new tree for every 30 residents.

Residents enjoy the city’s two community gardens and the more than 200 fruit trees the city planted in 2014. The orchard is part of a facility designed in partnership with the University of Nebraska – Lincoln to provide storage and opportunities for youth outdoor learning activities. The new building is the first compressed laminated timber structure in Nebraska. Ash tree planks salvaged from emerald ash borer kill and milled by the Nebraska Forest Service side the building. The project received the 2017 Community Enhancement Award from the Arbor Day Foundation.

South Sioux City’s extensive trail network earned the first “Bicycle Friendly Community Award” in Nebraska in 2006, and hosts many rides, runs and other events throughout the year.

South Sioux City’s extensive trail network earned the first “Bicycle Friendly Community Award” in Nebraska in 2006, and hosts many rides, runs and other events throughout the year. (Photo by South Sioux City)

Quality of life is part of environmental health too, and South Sioux City actively promotes healthy lifestyles. The city’s extensive network of developed trails earned the first “Bicycle Friendly Community Award” in Nebraska in 2006. The trail system connects to 60 miles of trails in four cities and three states, and hosts many rides, runs and other events throughout the year.

Partners make it happen
Innovation doesn’t occur in a vacuum and partnership is as critical to South Sioux City’s efforts as vision is. City Administrator Lance Hedquist acknowledges that the city’s success with energy efficiency and renewable energy projects results from the support and trust of the mayor, council and staff who share his passion to make the city a great place to live and work.

South Sioux City’s collective approach to innovation, partnerships, governance and trust would be impressive in a city many times its size. In a small municipality, it deserves recognition: WAPA is proud to honor South Sioux City with the Administrator’s Award.